These days, there's really no reason to avoid opening a brokerage account. Those of you worried about rehypothecation risk should opt to open a cash-only brokerage account, not a margin account. Make sure you are covered by SIPC insurance. If you are smart about the firm with which you are working and are only buying ordinary domestic common stocks, you can probably get away with trading costs and commissions for less than a trip to your favorite coffee shop. 
Not if you can supply your own financial acumen and practical level-headedness. If you are not clueless about finances, or if you're personally acquainted with someone with considerable financial experience to share with you, there's no need to pay for advice. Having said that, however, the more money you have at risk, the more an advisor is worth hiring.
Although people may be eager to own a piece of Apple (ticker: AAPL) or Microsoft Corp. (MSFT), new investors should remember they don't have to buy individual stocks if they want money in the market. "I'm a big believer in index funds," says Adam Bergman, a senior tax partner with IRA Financial Group. "They do a really good job for the novice investor."
Knowing where you can put your money is a huge step, but you also need to figure out exactly how much to put there. If you don’t have a detailed budget, at least make a list of all your expenses: what you spend monthly on bills, loan payments, food and entertainment. Only invest once you know you can pay your monthly bills and you’ve saved at least three months’ worth of living expenses in an emergency fund.

Give yourself a few thousand in fake money and play investor for a bit while you get the hang of it. “Just start. Even with just a virtual portfolio. Start and then commit to building over time,” says Jane Barratt, CEO of investment education and advisory company GoldBean. “Don’t expect anything major to happen in a short time — build your money muscles by taking risks in a virtual portfolio.” TD Ameritrade offers paperMoney, its virtual trading platform. If you open an account, OptionsHouse offers its paperTRADE account to test your strategies. Outside of actual trading sites, MarketWatch and Investopedia offer simulators to get you started.
That’s because there are plenty of tools available to help you. One of the best is stock mutual funds, which are an easy and low-cost way for beginners to invest in the stock market. These funds are available within your 401(k), IRA or any taxable brokerage account. An S&P 500 fund, which effectively buys you small pieces of ownership in 500 of the largest U.S. companies, is a good place to start.
Thinkorswim, on the other hand, is a powerhouse designed for the advanced. This desktop application regularly racks up awards for its superior tools and features — research reports, real-time data, charts, technical studies. Things any other broker would charge a premium for. Also included: customizable workspaces, extensive third-party research, and a thriving trader chat room. There’s also a fully functional mobile app.
Let's start with this basic truth: At its core, investing is about laying out money today with the expectation of getting more money back in the future — which, accounting for time, adjusting for risk, and factoring in inflation, results in a satisfactory compound annual growth rate, particularly as compared to standards considered a "good" investment.

This was a quick reading book and informative to help aid in stock selection for the do-it-yourselfer investor or person wanting to learn about investing. It explains how to compare companies. It does not give any insight into when to buy or sell stocks. There are other books more informative. But, this is an easy read and handy book for a person wanting to learn more about investing.
In the case of GM, such a search would inform you that General Motors is tickered "NYSE: GM," which means it's listed on the New York Stock Exchange as ticker "GM"; whereas Disney is tickered "NYSE: DIS," also on the NYSE, as "DIS." A stock on the Nasdaq Stock Exchange would be a little different, with a ticker in the format "Nasdaq: XXXX" with anywhere from one to five letters.
During your wealth accumulation stage, consider over-weighing stocks that pay low or no dividends. Lower yielding stocks tend to be safer, have greater growth potential, eventually leading to bigger dividends later, and save you on taxes (by allowing you to defer tax on unrealized capital gains rather than paying tax on dividend, a form of forced distribution).[38]
To the inexperienced investor, investing may seem simple enough - all you need to do is go to a brokerage firm and open up an account, right? What you may not know, however, is that all financial institutions have minimum deposit requirements. In other words, they won't accept your account application unless you deposit a certain amount of money. With a sum as small as $1,000, some firms won't allow you to open an account.
×