Consider whether or not to short sell. This can be a "hedging" strategy, but it can also amplify your risk, so it's really suitable only for experienced investors. The basic concept is as follows: Instead of betting that the price of a security is going to increase, "shorting" is a bet that the price will drop. When you short a stock (or bond or currency), your broker actually lends you shares without your having to pay for them. Then you hope the stock's price goes down. If it does, you "cover," meaning you buy the actual shares at the current (lower) price and give them to the broker. The difference between the amount credited to you in the beginning and the amount you pay at the end is your profit.
Your asset allocation should vary based on your stage of life. For example, you might have a much higher percentage of your investment portfolio in stocks when you are younger. Also, if you have a stable, well-paying career, your job is like a bond: you can depend on it for steady, long-term income. This allows you to allocate more of your portfolio to stocks. Conversely, if you have a "stock-like" job with unpredictable income such as investment broker or stock trader, you should allocate less to stocks and more to the stability of bonds. While stocks allow your portfolio to grow faster, they also pose more risks. As you get older, you can transition into more stable investments, such as bonds. [11]
THE STOCK MARKET ENDED 2016 with a series of record-high days, and the Dow Jones industrial average has continued to inch toward a milestone level of 20,000. Soaring stock prices may have some people wishing they could get in on the action, but the process of buying, selling and trading stocks can be intimidating. Fortunately, it doesn't have to be that complicated.
You'll also want to look at a stock's P/E ratio, or price to earnings ratio, which is its market capitalization (the total value of its outstanding shares) divided by its earnings over the past year. Generally speaking, a high P/E ratio tells you that investors are placing a higher value on the company, which often means that company's stock will be more expensive than a company with a lower P/E ratio. But this doesn't always hold true. 
Crowdfunded real estate allows you to join other investors to pool your money to invest in a property – very similar to peer to peer lending. The great thing about this is that there are low minimums – depending on the platform you use, you can invest as little as $1,000 and be an owner in a property. Also, you don’t have to be an accredited investor to get started – anyone can do it.
To make mutual fund investing even more hassle-free, stay with index funds. For example, index funds that track the Standard & Poor’s 500 index are invested in the broad market, so your investment performance will track that index precisely. While you’ll never outperform the market in an index fund, you’ll never under-perform it either. As a new investor, this is as it should be.
What is a broker? A broker is someone that helps you make your stock market investments. You sign up for a service and get to listen to the advice of a seasoned stock market veteran. Brokers spend their life monitoring stocks and figuring out what makes a good investment and what makes a bad one. They can point you in the right direction and also inform you of any investment opportunities. They’re your middleman between you and the stock market, but everything ends with you. They can only invest when you give them the go ahead, so you still remain in control.
OptionsHouse doesn’t offer currency trading, and has limited commission-free and transaction-free offerings, but its 2016 acquisition by E*TRADE should help fill in those gaps as the two brokers continue to merge. OptionsHouse also falls short in mutual funds — it charges $20 per trade, as opposed to Ally Invest’s $9.95 — as well as currency trading, and commission-free ETFs, but for the active trader who know what they’re doing, it’s one of the best platforms available.
Most of us don’t have the time to research dozens of individual securities. There are a number of different routes you can take for access and help with investing. The premier choice is typically brokerage firms. These services come with fees, which you should research to find the lowest. There are plenty of brokerages you can join forces with including:
There are many fees an investor will incur when investing in mutual funds. One of the most important fees to focus on is the management expense ratio (MER), which is charged by the management team each year based on the amount of assets in the fund. The higher the MER, the worse it is for the fund's investors. It doesn't end there: you'll also see a number of sales charges called "loads" when you buy mutual funds.
Stock market returns have annualized 10% before inflation and 7% after inflation for over 100 years,[39] but can be extremely variable from year to year. From 2000-2015, for example, the compound annual growth rate of the S&P 500 was 4.2%. Don't count on 10% return, if you are investing for a short time frame, or if you are also invested in bonds and alternative investments, which have lower expected returns. Furthermore, remember that past performance does not guarantee future returns.
Hiring human brokers to make phone calls and sell clients on investing is costly. Because discount brokers avoid this cost, they can pass on the advantage to customers in the form of lower commissions. A simple rule in the financial world is that clients pay the brokers’ expenses, so the lower the brokers’ expenses, the lower the fees and commissions.
With this information in hand, you're ready to place your trade. Enter the stock symbol for the company you want to buy (or sell). Pick an action (buy or sell). Enter the number of shares you want to buy or sell, and confirm whether you're willing to pay whatever the current price is for that stock (that's a market order), or whether you're willing to wait and hope the stock reaches a specified price (a limit order).
If you want more help with your investing, there is a variety of ways to find financial advice: if you want someone who helps you in a non-sales environment, you can find an advisor in your area at one of the following sites: letsmakeaplan.org, www.napfa.org, and garrettplanningnetwork.com. You can also go to your local bank or financial institution. Many of these charge higher fees, however, and may require a large opening investment.

Andrew:                              01:12                     Yeah, so that fits right in and yeah, episode 100 let’s do something not special at all and just treat it like any other episode. I’m down for that. Had a question from a  listener to the podcast, and this is about acquisitions. So Hi Andrew. Just started listening to your podcast and the impulsively dove into the stock market through the Robin Hood and Mobile App.

"This book provides a good foundation for the beginning investor who is setting out to venture in the stock market. It tells you in plain English about the fundamentals of stock market and investment strategies to deepen your investing literacy. If you're looking for good advice on which stock to buy and when to sell it, you can find it in this book."—Best Ways to Invest Money Blog
Finding the best stocks to buy and watch starts with knowing what a big market winner looks like before it takes off. As noted above, IBD's study of the top-performing stocks in each market cycle since the 1880s has identified the seven telltale traits of market winners. Your goal is to find stocks that are displaying those same traits right now. Traits like explosive earnings and sales growth, a strong return on equity, a fast-growing and industry-leading product or service and strong demand among mutual fund managers.

The goal of your financial adviser/broker is to keep you as a client so that they can continue to make money off of you. They tell you to diversify so that your portfolio follows the Dow and the S&P 500. That way, they will always have an excuse when it goes down in value. The average broker/adviser has very little knowledge of the underlying economics of business. Warren Buffett is famous for saying, "Risk is for people who don't know what they're doing."


Some people think that home values are guaranteed to go up. History has shown otherwise: real estate values in most areas show very modest rates of return after accounting for costs such as maintenance, taxes and insurance. As with many investments, real estate values do invariably rise if given enough time. If your time horizon is short, however, property ownership is not a guaranteed money-maker. [6]
At the other end of the spectrum, higher-risk companies can offer even bigger rewards for those who can find the best prospects. If you look at smaller companies' stocks, you can make discoveries early in a company's existence that can result in much higher returns than if you wait until a company is large enough to hit the radar screens of those in the mainstream investment community. Often, the stocks with the highest growth potential won't fit neatly into any one category, but even once the investing public starts to notice them and bids up their shares to what can appear to be extremely expensive levels, choosing the right stocks can leave you with opportunities for future gains.
Roth IRA. "My first and strongly encouraged piece of advice to the new investor would be to open a Roth IRA," McKaig says. "Roth IRAs offer new investors several benefits, chief among them the ability to receive tax-free income later in life," he adds. "The government does not tax either the contributions or the earnings growth when the funds are withdrawn in retirement. That can result in a pretty significant nest egg after decades of compounding growth."
Popular financial goals include buying a home, paying for your child’s college, amassing a “rainy day” emergency fund, and saving for retirement. Rather than having a general goal such as “own a home,” set a specific goal: “Save $63,000 for a down-payment on a $311,000 house.” (Most home loans require a down payment of between 20% and 25% of the purchase price in order to attract the most affordable interest rate.) [3]
Discount brokers used to be the exception, but now they're the norm. According to a report by Charles Schwab, 58 percent of Americans say they will use some sort of roboadvice by 2025. As the space of financial services has progressed in the 21st century, online brokers have added more features including educational materials on their sites and mobile apps. Still, traditional brokers earn their high fees by giving advice detailed to your needs.
What's surprising to many investors is that this simple philosophy actually works better than alternatives. Many people believe that frequent trading is the key to making money in the stock market, and day-trading techniques purport to show people how to get rich quickly by counting on buying and selling shares quickly at small profits that add up over time. However, the vast majority of frequent traders lose money over any given year, and one research report found that fewer than 1% of day traders find ways to make money consistently on a regular basis.
Thinkorswim, on the other hand, is a powerhouse designed for the advanced. This desktop application regularly racks up awards for its superior tools and features — research reports, real-time data, charts, technical studies. Things any other broker would charge a premium for. Also included: customizable workspaces, extensive third-party research, and a thriving trader chat room. There’s also a fully functional mobile app.
With that in mind, there are certain types of stocks that make excellent long-term investments, especially for beginners. There are many things to look for in your first stock investments, but just to name a few: You'll want to learn basic ways to value stocks, identify durable competitive advantages, and understand how a business makes money. Of course, our writers at The Motley Fool regularly suggest some good beginner stocks, like these examples.

When you've been approved for margin stock trading, you're also eligible to short stock. Almost every successful stock trader has shorted stock at one time or another. When you short stock, you make money when the company's shares fall—or, even better yet, when they crash. The problem is that you can expose yourself to unlimited liability when you do this. 


Any company you invest in needs to have a moat. That is, they need to have something that prevents their competition from coming in and stealing away the control they have over their market. For example, Coca-Cola is a company with a great moat. Anyone can make soft drinks, but Coca-Cola has entrenched itself in the market. No new soft drink company is going to be stealing away their customers anytime soon.

Whether or not your employer offers matching, though, you'll need to invest the money you put in the account. Your 401(k) will probably have a default option, but choose the mutual funds or other investment vehicles that make the most sense for your future needs. As money gets automatically added to your account with each paycheck, it will be put toward that investment.

Investor Junkie is a financial publisher that does not offer any personal financial advice or advocate the purchase or sale of any security or investment for any specific individual. Members should be aware that investment markets have inherent risks, and past performance does not assure future results. Investor Junkie has advertising relationships with some of the offers listed on this website. Investor Junkie does attempt to take a reasonable and good faith approach to maintaining objectivity towards providing referrals that are in the best interest of readers. Investor Junkie strives to keep its information accurate and up to date. The information on Investor Junkie could be different from what you find when visiting a third-party website. All products are presented without warranty. For more information, please read our full disclaimer.
You editors of these financial info pieces should STOP saying that tax deferred means NO taxes incurred as you did in the last sentence. I have read this over and over in various info articles and it is NOT correct. You will pay the taxes, just not annually, you wait until you take distributions; but you will pay taxes on tax deferred accounts such as IRA at some point. To DEFER is to DELAY or POSTPONE not eliminate! stockinvestmenttips.wmv
×