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Outside the box, the vertical line represents the high and low points of the day for the stock. If there’s quite a bit of space below the box, you can tell there was a lot of selling pressure on the stock for much of the day before it went up to settle where it did. On the flip side, if there’s a lot of line above the box, buyers were pushing the stock hard at points during the day.
Your asset allocation should vary based on your stage of life. For example, you might have a much higher percentage of your investment portfolio in stocks when you are younger. Also, if you have a stable, well-paying career, your job is like a bond: you can depend on it for steady, long-term income. This allows you to allocate more of your portfolio to stocks. Conversely, if you have a "stock-like" job with unpredictable income such as investment broker or stock trader, you should allocate less to stocks and more to the stability of bonds. While stocks allow your portfolio to grow faster, they also pose more risks. As you get older, you can transition into more stable investments, such as bonds. [11]
If you’re considering getting started investing in collectibles, make sure you do a lot of homework and get educated first. This is also an area where there are a lot of investing scams. It’s also important to remember that collectible investment gains are taxed at a much higher rate that other investments – which is your ordinary income tax rate (not the special 20% for capital gains).
The most important thing you can do is get an investing education first. Learn the basics of the stock market and if there is something that you don’t quite understand, ask. That’s the secret to successful investing for beginners. A good place to start is by reading Rule #1. It gives a great foundation to investing principles used by Warren Buffett and other great investors.
Mutual funds come in different shapes and sizes. Some are actively managed, meaning there is a team of analysts and other experts employed by the fund company to research and understand a particular geographical region or economic sector. Because of this professional management, such funds generally cost more than index funds, which simply mimic an index and don't need much management. They can be bond-heavy, stock-heavy, or invest in stocks and bonds equally. They can buy and sell their securities actively, or they can be more passively managed (as in the case of index funds).
Consider investing mainly in stocks but also in bonds to diversify your portfolio. From 1925 to 2011, stocks outperformed bonds in every rolling 25-year period. While this may sound appealing from a return standpoint, it entails volatility, which can be worrisome. Add less-volatile bonds to your portfolio for the sake of stability and diversification. The older you get, the more appropriate it becomes to own bonds (a more conservative investment). Re-read the above discussion of diversification.
Billionaire investor and CEO of Berkshire Hathaway, Warren Buffett, wanted to enable everyday investors to get in on his stock while not splitting the existing stock (making one existing share worth two or three shares, etc.). While splitting stock can attract new investors, it can also encourage speculative investment from those looking to make a quick profit by buying into the new, cheaper stock and getting out a short time later after making a quick profit when the stock goes up. If enough people were to sell too quickly, it could seriously devalue the stock.
What is a broker? A broker is someone that helps you make your stock market investments. You sign up for a service and get to listen to the advice of a seasoned stock market veteran. Brokers spend their life monitoring stocks and figuring out what makes a good investment and what makes a bad one. They can point you in the right direction and also inform you of any investment opportunities. They’re your middleman between you and the stock market, but everything ends with you. They can only invest when you give them the go ahead, so you still remain in control.
There are no guidelines for dollar amounts per investment. The best rule is to select many different investments, and put no more than 5% or 10% of your money into any one investment. That way a single failure will not hurt you too badly. That's why mutual funds and ETFs have become so popular: they allow you to be invested in many different stocks, bonds, or commodities at once.

If people don’t vote for their politicians and then complain about their governance actions, then maybe they should vote next time. Similarly, if they complain about corporate behavior but don’t vote any of their company shares, and outsource all their ownership to index companies who just abstain on most things, then maybe they should own a stock or two and actually vote. Each individual vote is tiny, but they add up.
1. Restrictions apply: The standard online $4.95 commission does not apply to foreign stock transactions, large block transactions requiring special handling, or restricted stock transactions (except for vested equity awards issued from an employer or corporate stock plan trades). See the Charles Schwab Pricing Guide for Individual Investors for full fee and commission schedules.

An important thing to note is that you aren’t going to learn investing overnight. Learning how to invest in the stock market is a skill you’ll acquire with patience and some guidance. Becoming a successful investor, and learning how to identify investments with high returns, is a process. It will take some time to understand all of the ins and outs of financial investing 101, but by reading this guide, you’ll be on your way.
In terms of diversification, the greatest amount of difficulty in doing this will come from investments in stocks. This was illustrated in the commissions section of the article, where we discussed how the costs of investing in a large number of stocks could be detrimental to the portfolio. With a $1,000 deposit, it is nearly impossible to have a well-diversified portfolio, so be aware that you may need to invest in one or two companies (at the most) to begin with. This will increase your risk.
And if you’re interested in learning how to invest, but you need a little help getting up to speed, robo-advisors can help there, too. It’s useful to see how the service constructs a portfolio and what investments are used. Some services also offer educational content and tools, and a few even allow you to customize your portfolio to a degree if you wish to experiment a bit in the future.

Sell it when the price has recently risen substantially (unless you have good reason to believe it will continue to rise in the immediate future). Do not sell it when the price has recently fallen substantially (unless you have good reason to believe it will continue to fall in the immediate future). Even though this is an emotionally difficult way to buy and sell, it's the best way to make money over the long term.
Where to learn the jargon. Stocks come with their own language. There are things like "limit orders" that dictate buying at a certain price or "trading on margin" which is essentially borrowing money to purchase stocks. Jeff Reeves, executive editor of InvestorPlace, a resource for individual investors, says people shouldn't worry too much about the terms when they are starting out. Rather than try complicated transactions, new investors are best served by simply buying securities at market price. As people get comfortable with the basics, they can then branch out into more advanced trading scenarios.

While you are accumulating money for investments and piling them into mutual funds and ETF’s, you should use this time to educate yourself about the game of investing. Read books, listen to CDs, read The Wall Street Journal, take a course or two at a brokerage firm or even a community college, join investment forums, and regularly visit investment websites, like InvestorJunkie.com.
It’s important to consider transaction costs and fees when choosing your investments. Costs and fees can eat into your returns and reduce your gains. It is vital to know what costs you will be liable for when you purchase, hold, or sell stock. Common transaction costs for stocks include commissions, bid-ask spread, slippage, SEC Section 31 fees [31], and capital gains tax. For funds, costs may include management fees, sales loads, redemption fees, exchange fees, account fees, 12b-1 fees, and operating expenses. [32] 
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