There are many fees an investor will incur when investing in mutual funds. One of the most important fees to focus on is the management expense ratio (MER), which is charged by the management team each year, based on the amount of assets in the fund. The MER ranges from 0.05 percent to 0.7 percent annually and varies depending on the type of fund. But the higher the MER, the worse it is for the fund's investors.


For newcomers to investing, InvestorPlace is pleased to offer the following resource articles on investing for beginners. The following information will help you get to know more about this exciting topic to help you become an educated investor – after all, it’s your money, and you want it to work towards your financial goals. Check out the latest investing for beginners articles today!


Typically sold as mutual funds or exchange-traded funds, these combine a number of stocks in one fund that is designed to mimic the returns of the Standard & Poor's 500 index, Russell 2000 or another stock market index. Each index tracks a section of the stock market. For instance, the Nasdaq composite tracks technology firms, while the Russell 2000 includes smaller businesses.
The best brokerages for beginners have associated account minimums ranging from $0 to $2,500. Many of these companies offer Roth IRAs with no minimum balance. Through your Roth IRA, you can invest a few hundred dollars in mutual funds or commission-free ETFs, or exchange-traded funds (ETFs), which reflect stock market indexes but often cost less than an index fund, without needing to save up thousands of dollars first.
Congratulations! By making it to this article you've taken an important first step in your investing journey -- picking a broker. There are many stock brokers to choose from, and each offers something a little bit different. See our article below for more info on what you should be looking for, along with a list of our top online stock broker picks for beginners.

Generally the longer the term of the bond, the higher the interest rate. If you're lending your money for a year, you probably won't get a high interest rate, because one year is a relatively short period of risk. If you're going to lend your money and not expect it back for ten years, however, you will be compensated for the higher risk you're taking, and the interest rate will be higher. This illustrates an axiom in investing: The higher the risk, the higher the return.


It’s important to consider transaction costs and fees when choosing your investments. Costs and fees can eat into your returns and reduce your gains. It is vital to know what costs you will be liable for when you purchase, hold, or sell stock. Common transaction costs for stocks include commissions, bid-ask spread, slippage, SEC Section 31 fees [31], and capital gains tax. For funds, costs may include management fees, sales loads, redemption fees, exchange fees, account fees, 12b-1 fees, and operating expenses. [32]
Before we get into it, it should be noted that as with any investment vehicle, the stock market comes with its own set of risks and rewards, pluses and minuses, some of which we’ll get into below. You should always be aware of your own comfort level with investments and not go beyond that level. A financial advisor can help you with planning and determining the right strategy based on your risk tolerance.
You editors of these financial info pieces should STOP saying that tax deferred means NO taxes incurred as you did in the last sentence. I have read this over and over in various info articles and it is NOT correct. You will pay the taxes, just not annually, you wait until you take distributions; but you will pay taxes on tax deferred accounts such as IRA at some point. To DEFER is to DELAY or POSTPONE not eliminate!
If you’re wondering how to get into the stock market using direct investments, then you have a couple of options. Naturally, you can find a broker, and they will set everything up and help you get started. It makes sense to look around and try to find the best broker for you and your budget. Look at their track record and try to find previous client reviews. If they’re well-known for guiding clients to profitable investments, then they’re well worth your time.

In terms of the beginning investor, the mutual fund fees are actually an advantage relative to the commissions on stocks. The reason for this is that the fees are the same, regardless of the amount you invest. Therefore, as long as you meet the minimum requirement to open an account, you can invest as little as $50 or $100 per month in a mutual fund. The term for this is called dollar cost averaging (DCA), and it can be a great way to start investing.

Andrew:                              01:12                     Yeah, so that fits right in and yeah, episode 100 let’s do something not special at all and just treat it like any other episode. I’m down for that. Had a question from a  listener to the podcast, and this is about acquisitions. So Hi Andrew. Just started listening to your podcast and the impulsively dove into the stock market through the Robin Hood and Mobile App.

How to get great advice: Feeling too intimidated to pick your first stock or fund? There are a lot of great -- and cheap -- services that will do it for you. Betterment and Wealthfront are good examples. They use computer models to figure out the best portfolio mix for you based on your age, income, goals and tax situation and they will invest your money for you.

The main difference between ETFs and index funds is that rather than carrying a minimum investment, ETFs are traded throughout the day and investors buy them for a share price, which like a stock price, can fluctuate. That share price is essentially the ETF’s investment minimum, and depending on the fund, it can range from under $100 to $300 or more.
Technically, you are only limited by the minimum amount required by a brokerage firm or mutual fund company to open an account. ShareBuilder, an online broker, has no required minimum account balance. More than 50 mutual funds included in our annual mutual fund guide have minimum purchase requirements of $100 or less, including funds offered by Fidelity, AssetMark, USAA and Oakmark.
Other industries perform well in poor or falling economies. These industries and companies are usually not as affected by the economy. For example, utilities and insurance companies are usually less affected by consumer confidence, because people still have to pay for electricity and health insurance. These industries and companies are known as “defensive” or “counter-cyclical.” [21]
Dave:                                    00:36                     All right folks, we’ll welcome to the Investing for Beginners podcast. This is episode ninety-eight. Tonight we’re going to talk about why you shouldn’t be a lone wolf investor. And I’m going to have Andrew kind of take us from there. All Right, Andrew, why don’t you go ahead and chat.
There are several reasons for this. First, transaction costs like commissions and taxes eat into profits and can exacerbate overall losses. Second, the short-term randomness of share-price movements makes day trading like gambling, and it's tough to maintain emotional detachment in that setting, leaving you open to mistakes that can cause massive losses.
If you were to sell these five stocks, you would once again incur the costs of the trades, which would be another $50. To make the round trip (buying and selling) on these five stocks would cost you $100, or 10 percent of your initial deposit amount of $1,000. If your investments don't earn enough to cover this, you have lost money by just entering and exiting positions.

There’s good news: You largely can, thanks to robo-advisors. These services manage your investments for you using computer algorithms. Due to low overhead, they charge low fees relative to human investment managers — a robo-advisor typically costs 0.25% to 0.50% of your account balance per year, and many allow you to open an account with no minimum.


One of the most dangerous moves an investor can make is to put all of his money into one investment, especially if there is considerable risk involved. Sinking every dollar into your favorite tech company, for example, is risky even if you’re sure that stock will continue to dominate for many years. Part of mastering “Investing 101” is understanding that unexpected occurrences can wipe out years of earnings in a matter of days.
And if you’re interested in learning how to invest, but you need a little help getting up to speed, robo-advisors can help there, too. It’s useful to see how the service constructs a portfolio and what investments are used. Some services also offer educational content and tools, and a few even allow you to customize your portfolio to a degree if you wish to experiment a bit in the future.
Start a business. You don't need much to start a business today. And you don't even need much specialized skills. Get creative. Make yourself look professional by getting a pack of business cards for as low as just $10. There are many small businesses you can start for as little as $100. Whether you work the business full-time or operate it as a side hustle, it can help you bring in money.
Diversify. Diversifying your portfolio is one of the most important things that you can do, because it diminishes your risk. Think of it this way: If you were to invest $5 in each of 20 different companies, all of the companies would have to go out of business before you would lose all your money. If you invested the same $100 in just one company, only that company would have to fail for all your money to disappear. Thus, diversified investments "hedge" against each other and keep you from losing lots of money because of the poor performance of a few companies.
Once you identify a company that seems undervalued, the next step is to estimate its true value. One way is to calculate the present value of future cash flows. Most individual investors rely on professionals to make both the necessary estimates and the calculations. Keep in mind that all the players in the market have access to those same estimates, so they are often—but not always—baked into the price of the stock.
A more reliable investment income strategy is to never sell your principle, and instead live off dividend and interest income. A diversified collection of dividend-paying blue chip stocks that have historically grown their dividends even through recessions, combined with some other assets for diversification, can produce more reliable investment income and makes it so you don’t have to touch your principle.
The 10/10 rule expects a 10% CAGR (compound annual growth rate) dividend growth to pass the test. To achieve consistent dividend growth with a 10% CAGR growth, a company must be able to grow the earnings, otherwise, the payout ratio will get out of hands. If the dividend payout ratio becomes an issue, investors will start assuming the dividend is at risk. Investors will sell, the price will go down, the dividend yield will go up and either the dividend is reduced or there is earnings growth.
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It is never too soon to start investing. Investing is the smartest way to secure your financial future and to begin letting your money make more money for you. Investing is not just for people who have plenty of spare cash. On the contrary, anyone can (and should) invest. You can get started with just a little bit of money and a lot of know-how. By formulating a plan and familiarizing yourself with the tools available, you can quickly learn how to start investing.
Once you've learned the basics, and you've come up with your game plan, the next step is to open a brokerage account and put your plan into action. Be sure to shop around, as different brokerages charge different fees and offer different features. As a new investor, you'll want a brokerage which offers access to investment research and educational features, in order to help with stock selection and to answer any questions you might have along the way.
Do not day-trade, swing-trade, or otherwise trade stocks for very short-term profits. Remember, the more frequently you trade, the more commissions you incur, which will reduce any gains you make. Also, short-term gains are taxed more heavily than long-term (more than one-year) gains. The best reason to avoid ultra-short-term trades is that success in that area requires a great deal of skill, knowledge and nerve, to say nothing of luck. It is not for the inexperienced.
If you’ve never invested in the stock market before, it can be an intimidating process. Stocks are not like savings accounts, money market funds, or certificates of deposit, in that their principal value can both rise and fall. If you don’t have sufficient knowledge of investing — or emotional control — you can lose most or even all of your investment capital.
Generally the longer the term of the bond, the higher the interest rate. If you're lending your money for a year, you probably won't get a high interest rate, because one year is a relatively short period of risk. If you're going to lend your money and not expect it back for ten years, however, you will be compensated for the higher risk you're taking, and the interest rate will be higher. This illustrates an axiom in investing: The higher the risk, the higher the return.
It's crucial to educate yourself before you wade into any type of investment or investment strategy. This beginner's guide to online stock trading will give you a starting point and walk you through several processes: choosing a discount broker, the 12 types of stock trades you can make, how to select individual stocks, uncovering hidden fees, expenses, and commissions, and much more. 
Make a list of things you want. To set your goals, you’ll need to have an idea of what things or experiences you want to have in your life that require money. For example, what lifestyle do you want to have once you retire? Do you enjoy traveling, nice cars, or fine dining? Do you have only modest needs? Use this list to help you set your goals in the next step. [1]

Another key metric to look at is return on equity, which measures a company's ability to turn capital into profits. Return on equity is calculated by taking a year's worth of earnings and dividing that figure by the average shareholder equity for that year. If that number is 15%, for instance, then 15 cents worth of assets are generated for every dollar investors put in. Again, you'll want to compare that number to other companies in the industry to see how it stacks up.
Diversification is considered to be the only free lunch in investing. (If you are new to this concept, check out Introduction To Diversification, The Importance Of Diversification and A Guide To Portfolio Construction.) In a nutshell, by investing in a range of assets, you reduce the risk of one investment's performance severely hurting the return of your overall investment. You could think of it as financial jargon for "don't put all of your eggs in one basket".
Buying at the best time. Once you know what to buy, don't run out and make a purchase immediately. "There's a reason Wall Street makes money consistently and the average investor doesn't," Seiden says. According to him, that's because Wall Street investors wait until the share price drops before making a purchase, while many new investors buy when prices are highest.
At the other end of the spectrum, higher-risk companies can offer even bigger rewards for those who can find the best prospects. If you look at smaller companies' stocks, you can make discoveries early in a company's existence that can result in much higher returns than if you wait until a company is large enough to hit the radar screens of those in the mainstream investment community. Often, the stocks with the highest growth potential won't fit neatly into any one category, but even once the investing public starts to notice them and bids up their shares to what can appear to be extremely expensive levels, choosing the right stocks can leave you with opportunities for future gains.
Popular financial goals include buying a home, paying for your child’s college, amassing a “rainy day” emergency fund, and saving for retirement. Rather than having a general goal such as “own a home,” set a specific goal: “Save $63,000 for a down-payment on a $311,000 house.” (Most home loans require a down payment of between 20% and 25% of the purchase price in order to attract the most affordable interest rate.) [3]
Short selling can be dangerous, however, because it's not easy to predict a drop in price. If you use shorting for the purpose of speculation, be prepared to get burned sometimes. If the stock's price were to go up instead of down, you would be forced to buy the stock at a higher price than what was credited to you initially. If, on the other hand, you use shorting as a way to hedge your losses, it can actually be a good form of insurance.

Exchange-traded funds (ETFs) and mutual funds share many characteristics, but they have a few distinct differences. A mutual fund is a literal company that pools the funds of investors to employ a predetermined investment strategy. Some invest in a selection of stocks or bonds, while others track certain indexes. These funds usually employ minimum investments of $3,000 or more, though some drop that number to as low as $500.


When you first begin investing you’ll be far better off with mutual funds and ETFs than plunging right into stocks. Funds are professionally managed, and this will remove the burden of stock selection from your plate. All you need to do is determine how much money you want to put into a given fund, or group of funds, and then you’re free to get on with the rest of your life.

Dividend reinvestment programs are often coupled with cash investment options that resemble direct stock purchase plans so you can regularly have money withdrawn from your checking or savings account, or send in one-time payments whenever you feel like, perhaps as little as $25, buying more shares of stock in a business as you might purchase something from a mail-order catalog.
Investing in mutual funds — collections of stocks chosen by a professional money manager and owned by a large group of investors — whether through your online broker or your retirement account, is one way to leave it to the pros. But even mutual funds present problems. Some funds charge high fees that eat into your returns, and, truthfully, most fund managers are no better equipped to beat the market than anyone else.

Another thing to look for is businesses in a commanding position within their market. What this means is that they’re at the top of their pile, and their rivals can’t find a way to knock them off their perch. A good example of this is Google. They’re easily the number one search engine in the world and have the most-used web browser, advertising platforms, etc. It’s hard for competitors to unseat them at the top, which means their stock will more likely grow than drop.
Investing in stocks for beginners is all about finding stable stocks that have a high chance of gaining value and low chance of dropping. To do this, you should look for businesses with a strong track record. Companies that show their stocks have increased in value over time, and are continuing to do so. This shows you there’s some stability there, and that you won’t be investing in stocks from a business that’s been up and down for years.
Tip: Have $500 or more to invest with a knowledge of how to invest? Consider Wealthfront. They are another robo-advisor that offers low trading fees. With Wealthfront, you can save for retirement, college, or standard investments. They waive the trading fees for the first $10,000 you invest, but do have a $500 minimum balance required. Keep in mind, though Wealthfront only offers digital account management. There are no humans providing advice or answering questions.
OptionsHouse doesn’t offer currency trading, and has limited commission-free and transaction-free offerings, but its 2016 acquisition by E*TRADE should help fill in those gaps as the two brokers continue to merge. OptionsHouse also falls short in mutual funds — it charges $20 per trade, as opposed to Ally Invest’s $9.95 — as well as currency trading, and commission-free ETFs, but for the active trader who know what they’re doing, it’s one of the best platforms available.
TD Ameritrade, Inc. and StockBrokers.com are separate, unaffiliated companies and are not responsible for each other’s services and products. Options are not suitable for all investors as the special risks inherent to options trading may expose investors to potentially rapid and substantial losses. Options trading privileges subject to TD Ameritrade review and approval. Please read Characteristics and Risks of Standardized Options before investing in options. Offer valid for one new Individual, Joint or IRA TD Ameritrade account opened by 9/30/2019 and funded within 60 calendar days of account opening with $3,000 or more. To receive $100 bonus, account must be funded with $25,000-$99,999. To receive $300 bonus, account must be funded with $100,000-$249,999. To receive $600 bonus, account must be funded with $250,000 or more. Offer is not valid on tax-exempt trusts, 401k accounts, Keogh plans, Profit Sharing Plan, or Money Purchase Plan. Offer is not transferable and not valid with internal transfers, accounts managed by TD Ameritrade Investment Management, LLC, TD Ameritrade Institutional accounts, and current TD Ameritrade accounts or with other offers. Qualified commission-free Internet equity, ETF or options orders will be limited to a maximum of 250 and must execute within 90 calendar days of account funding. No credit will be given for unexecuted trades. Contract, exercise, and assignment fees still apply. Limit one offer per client. Account value of the qualifying account must remain equal to, or greater than, the value after the net deposit was made (minus any losses due to trading or market volatility or margin debit balances) for 12 months, or TD Ameritrade may charge the account for the cost of the offer at its sole discretion. TD Ameritrade reserves the right to restrict or revoke this offer at any time. This is not an offer or solicitation in any jurisdiction where we are not authorized to do business. Please allow 3-5 business days for any cash deposits to post to account. Taxes related to TD Ameritrade offers are your responsibility. Retail values totaling $600 or more during the calendar year will be included in your consolidated Form 1099. Please consult a legal or tax advisor for the most recent changes to the U.S. tax code and for rollover eligibility rules. (Offer Code 264) TD Ameritrade Inc., member FINRA/SIPC. TD Ameritrade is a trademark jointly owned by TD Ameritrade IP Company, Inc. and The Toronto-Dominion Bank. © 2019 TD Ameritrade.
Our second pick, Fidelity Investments offers new investors an easy-to-use website and quality on-site education. While Fidelity's learning center is impressive, the broker does a fantastic job with its in-house market research and financial educational articles, Fidelity Viewpoints. Of all the brokers, I share and bookmark Fidelity Viewpoint articles the most. As far as subject matter goes, the broker's retirement education is exceptional. Read full review
Tip: Have $500 or more to invest with a knowledge of how to invest? Consider Wealthfront. They are another robo-advisor that offers low trading fees. With Wealthfront, you can save for retirement, college, or standard investments. They waive the trading fees for the first $10,000 you invest, but do have a $500 minimum balance required. Keep in mind, though Wealthfront only offers digital account management. There are no humans providing advice or answering questions.
In terms of diversification, the greatest amount of difficulty in doing this will come from investments in stocks. This was illustrated in the commissions section of the article, where we discussed how the costs of investing in a large number of stocks can be detrimental to the portfolio. With a $1,000 deposit, it is nearly impossible to have a well-diversified portfolio, so be aware that you may need to invest in one or two companies (at the most) to begin with. This will increase your risk.
Option trading entails a high level of risk and is not suitable for all investors. Certain requirements must be met to be approved for option trading. Those trading options (both Buyers and Sellers) should be familiar with the theory, strategy, pricing of options and related risk factors. Please read the Characteristics and Risks of Standardized Options before trading options.

You can also open a Roth IRA through a robo-advisor, which uses computer algorithms and advanced software to build and manage your investment portfolio. Robo-advisors largely build their portfolios out of low-cost ETFs and index funds. Because they offer low costs and low or no minimums, robos let you get started quickly. And they require little to no human interaction (still, many have human advisors available for questions).
The best investors are in it for the long haul. Checking your account too often might make you react to the fluctuations in the market too quickly. Personal finance expert Ramit Sethi has written that you should check your investments, “probably every few months, with a major review every year.” On many sites, you can also set an alert if a stock dives. Other than that, just set a quarterly recurring appointment so you know you’ll handle it at the right time.
In addition to attractive pricing, Ally offers a quality platform that gives you access to the entire universe of stocks and ETFs. Where some discount brokers focus on only one kind of trader (for example, options traders or high-net-worth investors), Ally Invest provides an excellent experience for investors of all kinds. A focus on discounted costs can sometimes be a red flag for quality, but Ally Invest truly delivers with sophisticated calculators, profit-loss estimators, and more. Ally Invest also offers a robust research library that incorporates visual slides and interactive media into its market data.
We’re firm believers in the Golden Rule. If we wouldn’t recommend an offer to a close family member, we wouldn’t recommend it on The Ascent either. Our number one goal is helping people find the best offers to improve their finances. That is why editorial opinions are ours alone and have not been previously reviewed, approved, or endorsed by included advertisers. Editorial content from The Ascent is separate from The Motley Fool editorial content and is created by a different analyst team.

Caution: Some brokerages will require a minimum initial deposit. Schwab, for example, requires $1,000 to start with. Others, such as Ameritrade, have no minimum at all. If you have only a little money to start out with, you will want to check on this requirement before going through all the virtual paperwork of setting up an account. But once you've met the minimum for your particular broker, you're ready to start trading.
Announcer:                        00:00                     You’re tuned in to the Investing for Beginners podcast. Finally, step by step premium investment guidance for beginners lead by Andrew Sather and Dave Ahern to decode industry jargon, silence crippling confusion and help you overcome emotions by looking at the numbers. Your path to financial freedom starts now.
Limit orders can cost investors more in commissions than market orders. A limit order that can’t be executed in full at one time or during a single trading day may continue to be filled over subsequent days, with transaction costs charged each day a trade is made. If the stock never reaches the level of your limit order by the time it expires, the trade will not be executed.
Favorable conditions within specific sectors of an economy, along with a targeted microeconomic view. [19] Certain industries are usually considered to do well in periods of economic growth, such as automobiles, construction, and airlines. In strong economies, consumers are likely to feel confident about their futures, so they spend more money and make more purchases. These industries and companies are known as “cyclical.” [20] 「Stock Talk 股票英語 Part A」biz全應用速效學習雙週報
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