There are no guidelines for dollar amounts per investment. The best rule is to select many different investments, and put no more than 5% or 10% of your money into any one investment. That way a single failure will not hurt you too badly. That's why mutual funds and ETFs have become so popular: they allow you to be invested in many different stocks, bonds, or commodities at once.
Mutual funds come in different shapes and sizes. Some are actively managed, meaning there is a team of analysts and other experts employed by the fund company to research and understand a particular geographical region or economic sector. Because of this professional management, such funds generally cost more than index funds, which simply mimic an index and don't need much management. They can be bond-heavy, stock-heavy, or invest in stocks and bonds equally. They can buy and sell their securities actively, or they can be more passively managed (as in the case of index funds).

A limit order gives you more control over the price at which your trade is executed. If XYZ stock is trading at $100 a share and you think a $95 per-share price is more in line with how you value the company, your limit order tells your broker to hold tight and execute your order only when the ask price drops to that level. On the selling side, a limit order tells your broker to part with the shares once the bid rises to the level you set.
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Basically, the goal of investing is to commit money, and in return that money will grow. However, investing involves risk. Whenever you’re not holding your money in your own bank account, there’s a risk of loss. With some investments, the risk is low; with others it’s high. The higher the risk, the more you’d better potentially earn to take that risk.


Meaning is something we’ve touched on already, but it’s also something that many investors sadly overlook. If a company has meaning to you – if you are inspired by and interested in what they do – you are going to be more likely to understand that company, more motivated to research them, and thus more likely to make wise decisions about when they should be bought and sold.
You can set up an account by depositing cash or stocks in a brokerage account. Firms like Charles Schwab and Citigroup’s Smith Barney unit offer brokerage accounts that can be managed online or with a broker in person. If you prefer buying and selling stocks online, you can use sites like E-Trade or Ameritrade. Those are just two of the most well-known electronic brokerages, but many large firms have online options as well.
If you still have high-interest debt, such as credit cards or personal loans, you should hold off on investing. Your money works harder for you by eliminating that pesky interest expense than it does in the market. This is because paying off $1 of debt balance saves you 12%, 14%, or more in future interest expense. More than traditional investments can be expected to return.
During your wealth accumulation stage, consider over-weighing stocks that pay low or no dividends. Lower yielding stocks tend to be safer, have greater growth potential, eventually leading to bigger dividends later, and save you on taxes (by allowing you to defer tax on unrealized capital gains rather than paying tax on dividend, a form of forced distribution).[38]
The best brokerages for beginners have associated account minimums ranging from $0 to $2,500. Many of these companies offer Roth IRAs with no minimum balance. Through your Roth IRA, you can invest a few hundred dollars in mutual funds or commission-free ETFs, or exchange-traded funds (ETFs), which reflect stock market indexes but often cost less than an index fund, without needing to save up thousands of dollars first.
When investing, look to get in with stocks in the areas you typically follow and have an interest in. If you’re already reading news and keeping up on these things anyway, it’ll make it that much easier to keep up on your investments. If you have expertise through interests or work, you likely know enough about the sector to make intelligent investments.
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Dollar cost averaging is the process of buying into your investment positions gradually, rather than all at once. For example, rather than investing $5,000 in a single index fund, you can make periodic contributions of say, $100 per month into the fund. By doing this, you remove the possibility of buying at the top of the market. Rather, you’re buying into the fund at all different times and on a continuous basis. This also removes the “when” question, as in when to invest in a given security or fund.
Make a list of things you want. To set your goals, you’ll need to have an idea of what things or experiences you want to have in your life that require money. For example, what lifestyle do you want to have once you retire? Do you enjoy traveling, nice cars, or fine dining? Do you have only modest needs? Use this list to help you set your goals in the next step. [1]
A stock trade that might have cost you hundreds of dollars 30 years ago can now be completed from the convenience of your living room, costing you $7 or less through all of the platforms on our list of best online stock brokers. In the article below, we’ll explain how you can pick a brokerage firm that is best fit for your individual investing needs.
How do I determine if a broker is right for me before I open an account? Some key criteria to consider are how much money you have, what type of assets you intend to buy, your trading style and technical needs, how frequently you plan to transact and how much service you need. Our post about how to choose the best broker for you can help to arrange and rank your priorities.
Of course, if you really want to get a sense of a company's value and growth potential, you'll need to look at some numbers. You can start by reviewing its balance sheet, which lists its various assets and liabilities. You can access public companies' balance sheets on the SEC's EDGAR website. Similarly, you can look at a company's cash flow statement to get a sense of how it manages its money, and its income statement to get a sense of its profits and losses.
We tapped into the expertise of a former day trader and a financial commentator (with 20 years of trading experience) to grade 13 of the best online stock trading sites. To find our top picks, we analyzed pricing structures, dug into research and tools, and took every platform for a spin. Upfront: There is no one best online stock broker. Each has its own strengths and suits different types of investors and different investment strategies. We’ll help you find the best for your style and experience.

Before we get into it, it should be noted that as with any investment vehicle, the stock market comes with its own set of risks and rewards, pluses and minuses, some of which we’ll get into below. You should always be aware of your own comfort level with investments and not go beyond that level. A financial advisor can help you with planning and determining the right strategy based on your risk tolerance.
It’s like reverse inflation: The hamburger you could buy for $1 when you were a kid would cost you $5 decades later. But you can’t store the $1 burger away for years and sell when it’s worth $5. Instead, you can buy shares in a bunch of companies involved in making that burger — the bun and beef manufacturers, packaging producers, retailers and restaurants (we’ll show you how in a moment) — and reap the rewards of their growth right alongside them.
Online/discount brokers, on the other hand, do not provide any investment advice and are basically just order takers. They are much less expensive than full-service brokers since there is typically no office to visit and no certified investment advisors to help you. Cost is usually based on a per-transaction basis and you can typically open an account over the internet with little or no money. Once you have an account with an online broker, you can usually just log on to its website and into your account and be able to buy and sell stocks instantly.
As with any investment strategy, you need to give yourself a budget for your stock investments. If you’re just getting started, maybe you’ll make this budget based on some extra money you have. The stock market and the individual stocks you pick can go up, but they can also go down. Any investment has risks, and you might lose some money. It’s always advisable not to put all your eggs in one basket.
ETFs are typically index funds and do not generate as much in the way of taxable capital gains to pass on to investors as compared with actively managed funds. ETFs and mutual funds are becoming less distinct from each other, and investors need not own both types of investment. If you like the idea of buying and selling fund shares during (rather than at the end of) the trading day, ETFs are a good choice for you.
Markets will fluctuate, that’s a fact and a reality you will face and not all stocks bounced back at the same rate. The last decision you need to make is to understand which stock fit best in your portfolio. As mentioned earlier, are you either in the accumulating or retirement phase of your life. Each of those phases may have a different strategy that will guide you make the final decision for which stock to buy.

You'll also want to look at a stock's P/E ratio, or price to earnings ratio, which is its market capitalization (the total value of its outstanding shares) divided by its earnings over the past year. Generally speaking, a high P/E ratio tells you that investors are placing a higher value on the company, which often means that company's stock will be more expensive than a company with a lower P/E ratio. But this doesn't always hold true. 

Now, imagine that you decide to buy the stocks of those five companies with your $1,000. To do this you will incur $50 in trading costs, which is equivalent to 5% of your $1,000. If you were to fully invest the $1,000, your account would be reduced to $950 after trading costs. This represents a 5% loss, before your investments even have a chance to earn a cent!
By far and away the biggest question every beginner wants to know the answer to is what stocks are best for investing in? If you’re hoping this is where you find a list of stocks to invest in, then you’re about to be let down! There is no magic list of what stocks to invest in. (And be wary of advice from anyone who says otherwise!) Instead, there are a few things you can look for in stocks and shares that make them worth your money.
Have you ever watched an old movie and seen someone calling their stock broker? While you can still do that, there really isn’t any reason to. With today’s growing popularity of online stock market investing, you get to be your own stock broker. It is surprisingly easy to learn about investing. Now everyone has the ability to start investing in various low-cost investment options like penny stocks and other, online micro investment options. Below, we’re sharing our 5 investing basics – including tips on the best investments for beginners and details on how to start investing with little money.
Invest in a Roth IRA as soon in your working career as possible. If you're earning taxable income and you're at least 18, you can establish a Roth IRA. This is a retirement account to which you can contribute up to an IRS-determined maximum each year (the latest limit is the lesser of $5,500 or the amount earned plus an additional $1,000 "catch up" contribution for those age 50 or older). This money gets invested and begins to grow. A Roth IRA can be a very effective way to save for retirement.

That means you can start with as little as 1% of each paycheck, though it’s a good idea to aim for contributing at least as much as your employer match. For example, a common matching arrangement is 50% of the first 6% of your salary you contribute. To capture the full match in that scenario, you would have to contribute 6% of your salary each year. But you can work your way up to that over time.
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