That’s because there are plenty of tools available to help you. One of the best is stock mutual funds, which are an easy and low-cost way for beginners to invest in the stock market. These funds are available within your 401(k), IRA or any taxable brokerage account. An S&P 500 fund, which effectively buys you small pieces of ownership in 500 of the largest U.S. companies, is a good place to start.
As with any investment strategy, you need to give yourself a budget for your stock investments. If you’re just getting started, maybe you’ll make this budget based on some extra money you have. The stock market and the individual stocks you pick can go up, but they can also go down. Any investment has risks, and you might lose some money. It’s always advisable not to put all your eggs in one basket.
Mutual funds. A mutual fund is a basket that contains a bunch of different investments — often mostly stocks — that all have something in common, be it companies that together make up a market index (see the box for more about the joys of index funds), a particular asset class (bonds, international stocks) or a specific sector (companies in the energy industry, technology stocks). There are even mutual funds that invest solely in companies that adhere to certain ethical or environmental principles (aka socially responsible funds).
If you were to sell these five stocks, you would once again incur the costs of the trades, which would be another $50. To make the round trip (buying and selling) on these five stocks it would cost you $100, or 10% of your initial deposit amount of $1,000. If your investments don't earn enough to cover this, you have lost money by just entering and exiting positions.
Investing in the stock market is a do-it-yourself way to plan for a comfortable old age. There will be ups and downs in the market, of course, but investing young means you have decades to ride them out. It’s also important because benefits from Social Security account for only around 38% of U.S. seniors’ income, according to the Social Security Administration. That figure may well decline in the coming decades because Social Security has been paying out more to retirees than it has been taking in from taxes paid by workers.
Different investors are going to prioritize different things. A day trader, for example, requires speed and flexibility. A first-time trader may value educational resources and reliable customer support. But one thing every trader should care about is cost. Not paying attention to investment expenses is like revving your car engine while filling it with gas. That's why we spent a lot of time balancing price with what each site offered.
First and foremost: If you prefer professional guidance at any point, there are many reputable brokerage firms available online and in-person geared toward helping you make lucrative investments. However, you should keep in mind that firms and brokers are associated with separate fees, including commission, which can bring up your expenses considerably.
Invest in short-term cash investments. Certificate of Deposits (CDs) offer market risk protection for your cash while keeping it safe from being spent. You must deposit a fixed amount of money for a specified period. And you get interest in return. The longer you commit the money, the larger your return. Read our comprehensive list of short term investments ideas.
We hope your first stock purchase marks the beginning of a lifelong journey of successful investing. But if things turn difficult, remember that every investor — even Warren Buffett — goes through rough patches. The key to coming out ahead in the long term is to keep your perspective and concentrate on the things that you can control. Market gyrations aren’t among them. What you can do is:
Like many new investors, you've decided to invest in a company and pick up your first shares of stock, but your limited knowledge leaves you wondering how to do it. Don't worry! This overview was designed to help you learn precisely that - how to invest in stocks. To be more specific, for you new investors, this page was put together to serve as an introductory depository of investment articles designed to get many of the basics out of the way before moving on to some of the more advanced topics which I've written over the past years.
We do receive compensation from some partners whose offers appear here. That's how we make money. Compensation may impact where offers appear on our site but our editorial opinions are in no way affected by compensation. The Ascent does not cover all offers on the market. Our commitment to you is complete honesty: we will never allow advertisers to influence our opinion of offers that appear on this site.
Now, imagine that you decide to buy the stocks of those five companies with your $1,000. To do this you will incur $50 in trading costs, which is equivalent to 5% of your $1,000. If you were to fully invest the $1,000, your account would be reduced to $950 after trading costs. This represents a 5% loss, before your investments even have a chance to earn a cent!
By creating a budget, you can determine how much money you have to invest. You can assign portions of your income to various savings goals, ranging from shorter-term ones, like buying a house, to longer-term ones, like retirement. Before you allocate money to your investment goals, however, many financial experts recommend putting aside money for an emergency fund.

Also similar to a bank account, once your online brokerage account is open, the brokerage will ask you to "fund" it. You can do this in any of several ways -- for example, by mailing a check or making an electronic deposit directly from your bank. If you happen to sign up with a brokerage that has a physical office nearby, you could even walk in and hand someone a duffel bag full of cash.


For newcomers to investing, InvestorPlace is pleased to offer the following resource articles on investing for beginners. The following information will help you get to know more about this exciting topic to help you become an educated investor – after all, it’s your money, and you want it to work towards your financial goals. Check out the latest investing for beginners articles today!
We think a low minimum to open an account is a real advantage when you’re just starting out. That’s because you can start with…say, $500, and then add to your balance over time with monthly or annual contributions to your account. For most people, the hardest step in investing is just getting started, so we prefer brokers who have a low minimum to open an account and place a trade, so as to avoid a potential roadblock on the way to saving and investing.
After you've decided the way you want to acquire your investment assets, your next decision regards where those investments will be held. This decision can have a major impact on how your investments are taxed, so it's not a decision to be made lightly. Your choices include taxable brokerage accounts, Traditional IRAs, Roth IRAs, Simple IRAs, SEP-IRA, and maybe even family limited partnerships (which can have some estate tax and gift tax planning benefits if implemented correctly).
These extra fees are another big cost to investors, but they aren’t deducted from your account balance. Instead, these fees show up in the price on the ticker tape. That’s why many high-priced mutual funds’ and ETFs’ value per share doesn’t seem to change over time — any growth is offset by fees. Also watch out for mutual funds that charge a front- or back-end load for each purchase or sale. These usually range from 0.5% to 1% and can add up quickly.
Actually, scratch that. Here's a better question: What company do you love? Are you a devoted buyer of Chevrolet trucks? If so, then maybe General Motors (NYSE:GM) is the stock for you. Were you first in line when Guardians of the Galaxy 2, Rogue One, or Beauty and the Beast opened at the cineplex? Then maybe you should take a look at Disney (NYSE:DIS) stock. Disney owns the Marvel, the Star Wars, and, of course, the Disney movie franchises.
Technically, you are only limited by the minimum amount required by a brokerage firm or mutual fund company to open an account. ShareBuilder, an online broker, has no required minimum account balance. More than 50 mutual funds included in our annual mutual fund guide have minimum purchase requirements of $100 or less, including funds offered by Fidelity, AssetMark, USAA and Oakmark.
Buying at the best time. Once you know what to buy, don't run out and make a purchase immediately. "There's a reason Wall Street makes money consistently and the average investor doesn't," Seiden says. According to him, that's because Wall Street investors wait until the share price drops before making a purchase, while many new investors buy when prices are highest. The World's Worst Stock Investment Advice
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