Put simply: Buying stocks online is easy, and yet it’s incredibly complicated to do it well. It’s almost always the best idea to let a professional handle it. With the current level of technology, you don’t need to even pick a professional — you can pick a program that a professional designed. That’s going to help you to grow a significant retirement nest egg, provided that you can leave the money sitting in your account long enough.
As the name implies, the “GARP” approach combines elements of value and growth investing, seeking to buy companies whose prices don’t fully reflect their solid growth prospects. For example, a company might be stuck in an out-of-favor industry sector but have new products in the pipeline that could propel it into a more attractive category. The particular emphasis given to growth and value varies considerably, although one or the other is usually clearly dominant. Among professional investors, GARP is sometimes used as an exception to give a value manager more flexibility to buy higher-priced stocks.

Announcer:                        00:00                     You’re tuned in to the Investing for Beginners podcast. Finally, step by step premium investment guidance for beginners led by Andrew Sather and Dave Ahern, to decode industry jargon. Silence crippling confusion and help you overcome emotions by looking at the numbers. Your path to financial freedom starts now.

Shouldn’t I just choose the cheapest broker? Trading costs definitely matter to active and high-volume traders. If you’re a high-volume trader — buying bundles of 100 to 500 shares at a time, for example — Interactive Brokers and TradeStation are cost-effective options. Ally Invest offers $3.95 trades ($1 off full price) for investors who place more than 30 trades a quarter.  Commissions are less of a factor for buy-and-hold investors, a strategy we recommend for the majority of people. Most brokers charge from $5 to $7 per trade. But other factors — access to a range of investments or training tools — may be more valuable than saving a few bucks when you purchase shares.


Congratulations! By making it to this article you've taken an important first step in your investing journey -- picking a broker. There are many stock brokers to choose from, and each offers something a little bit different. See our article below for more info on what you should be looking for, along with a list of our top online stock broker picks for beginners.
Some companies offer specialized portfolios for retirement investors. These are “asset allocation" or "target date" funds that automatically adjust their holdings based on your age. For example, your portfolio might be more heavily weighted towards equities when you are younger and automatically transfer more of your investments into fixed-income securities as you get older. In other words, they do for you what you might be expected to do yourself as you get older. [30] Be aware that these funds typically incur greater expenses than simple index funds and ETFs, but they perform a service the latter investments do not.

When you place an order for a stock, you specify how long the brokerage firm should try to fill your order before giving up and canceling it. Order timing is generally less important with market orders because they tend to be filled quickly, but it can be an important consideration for other order types, such as limit orders. The two most common order timing options are day only and good-till-canceled.
Announcer:                        00:00                     You’re tuned in to the Investing for Beginners podcast. Finally, step by step premium investment guidance for beginners led by Andrew Sather and Dave Ahern, to decode industry jargon. Silence crippling confusion and help you overcome emotions by looking at the numbers. Your path to financial freedom starts now.
Our experts suggest you begin by looking at your own life. “Buy what you know, where you are. If you can, identify good companies locally,” says Randy Cameron, a portfolio manager and investment advisor with 35 years of experience. “Look for companies you and your friends are talking about, ones with plans to go national.” As for how much time and money you need, “Start with what you have,” he says. There is literally no minimum to get started, and starting with just one share is better than putting things off.
Stock market returns have annualized 10% before inflation and 7% after inflation for over 100 years,[39] but can be extremely variable from year to year. From 2000-2015, for example, the compound annual growth rate of the S&P 500 was 4.2%. Don't count on 10% return, if you are investing for a short time frame, or if you are also invested in bonds and alternative investments, which have lower expected returns. Furthermore, remember that past performance does not guarantee future returns.
Beyond that, we evaluated each firm on the services that matter most to different types of investors. For example, for active traders, we note providers offering volume discounts on trade commissions and robust mobile trading platforms. For people venturing into investing for the first time, we call out brokers that provide educational support (such as stock-picking tutorials) and on-call chat or phone support.
Mutual funds come with fees. There may be charges (or "loads") when you buy or sell shares of the fund. The fund's "expense ratio" is expressed as a percentage of total assets and pays for overhead and management expenses. Some funds charge a lower-percentage fee for larger investments. Expense ratios generally range from as low as 0.15% (or 15 basis points, abbreviated "BPS") for index funds to as high as 2% (200 BPS) for actively managed funds. There may also be a "12b-1" fee charged to offset a fund's marketing expenses.

If you’re saving for a short-term goal, like a down payment for a house in the next five years, the risk associated with stocks makes it more likely you’ll lose money in that time frame. That means the percentage of your investments in stocks will decrease. If the time separating you from that goal is less than five years, invest in a money market fund or a bond fund. Both will bring you lower returns than stocks but are safer places to put money in the short term.
One type of broker isn’t necessarily better for everyone. In fact, many people use both types of services over their lifetime. A saver who is just starting out might have more reason to use a discount broker, so as to save money while accumulating assets for retirement. Given a full-service broker might charge you as much as $500 in fees to invest $10,000 in a fund, whereas a discount broker might charge as little as $5, the cost difference alone is reason enough for new investors to use a discount brokerage firm.
When people talk about investing in stocks, they usually mean investing in common stock, which is another way to describe business ownership, or business equity. When you own equity in a business, you are entitled to a share of the profit or losses generated by that company's operating activity. On an aggregate basis, equities have historically been the most rewarding asset class for investors seeking to build wealth over time without using large amounts of leverage.
If you want more help with your investing, there is a variety of ways to find financial advice: if you want someone who helps you in a non-sales environment, you can find an advisor in your area at one of the following sites: letsmakeaplan.org, www.napfa.org, and garrettplanningnetwork.com. You can also go to your local bank or financial institution. Many of these charge higher fees, however, and may require a large opening investment.
You'll have to do your homework to find the minimum deposit requirements and then compare the commissions to other brokers. Chances are you won't be able to cost-effectively buy individual stocks and still be diversified with a small amount of money. Given these restrictions, it's probably worth starting out on your investment journey with mutual funds. However, like all aspects of investing, it's up to you to do the research and figure out the strategy that suits you best.
Other key clues to look out for are how long the management team has been serving the company. Longevity is often a good sign that the folks in charge are doing something right. You'll also want a management team that's innovative and willing to take risks, but not too many risks. By reading up on a company and its history, you can get a sense of the sort of decisions its management team has made, and how those decisions have panned out.
Limit order -- A limit order differs from a market order in that the trade is only completed at a certain price. For example, if you enter an order to buy 10 shares of Nike at $70 each, the order will only go through if the broker can fill at it at a price of $70 per share. Limit orders are a good way to buy and sell stocks that trade less frequently, since there may not be enough willing sellers to fill a market order at a reasonable price. These orders are a good for “set and forget” investing, since you can place a limit order that will remain in effect until a stock reaches the price at which you’d like to buy.
In the case of GM, such a search would inform you that General Motors is tickered "NYSE: GM," which means it's listed on the New York Stock Exchange as ticker "GM"; whereas Disney is tickered "NYSE: DIS," also on the NYSE, as "DIS." A stock on the Nasdaq Stock Exchange would be a little different, with a ticker in the format "Nasdaq: XXXX" with anywhere from one to five letters.
Always compare a company to its peers. For example, assume you want to buy Company X. You can look at Company X's projected earnings growth, profit margins, and price-to-earnings ratio. You would then compare these figures to those of Company X's closest competitors. If Company X has better profit margins, better projected earnings, and a lower price-to-earnings ratio, it may be a better buy.

When you place an order for a stock, you specify how long the brokerage firm should try to fill your order before giving up and canceling it. Order timing is generally less important with market orders because they tend to be filled quickly, but it can be an important consideration for other order types, such as limit orders. The two most common order timing options are day only and good-till-canceled.
Where to learn the jargon. Stocks come with their own language. There are things like "limit orders" that dictate buying at a certain price or "trading on margin" which is essentially borrowing money to purchase stocks. Jeff Reeves, executive editor of InvestorPlace, a resource for individual investors, says people shouldn't worry too much about the terms when they are starting out. Rather than try complicated transactions, new investors are best served by simply buying securities at market price. As people get comfortable with the basics, they can then branch out into more advanced trading scenarios.
With the advent of online trading, there are a number of discount brokers with no (or very low) minimum deposit restrictions. One of the most popular online trading sites is ShareBuilder. You will, however, be faced with other restrictions and see higher fees for certain types of trades. This is something an investor with a $1,000 starting balance should take into account if he or she wants to invest in stocks.
A Roth IRA, on the other hand, is funded with post-tax dollars. This means you’ve already paid your income tax, so when you withdraw it in retirement, you don’t pay income or capital gains tax. The money is all yours. Roth IRAs offer excellent tax benefits but are only available to certain income levels. If you make more than $135,000 a year as a single filer or over $199,000 as a married filer, you aren’t eligible for a Roth IRA.

Technically, you are only limited by the minimum amount required by a brokerage firm or mutual fund company to open an account. ShareBuilder, an online broker, has no required minimum account balance. More than 50 mutual funds included in our annual mutual fund guide have minimum purchase requirements of $100 or less, including funds offered by Fidelity, AssetMark, USAA and Oakmark.
Invest in a Roth IRA as soon in your working career as possible. If you're earning taxable income and you're at least 18, you can establish a Roth IRA. This is a retirement account to which you can contribute up to an IRS-determined maximum each year (the latest limit is the lesser of $5,500 or the amount earned plus an additional $1,000 "catch up" contribution for those age 50 or older). This money gets invested and begins to grow. A Roth IRA can be a very effective way to save for retirement.
When you place an order for a stock, you specify how long the brokerage firm should try to fill your order before giving up and canceling it. Order timing is generally less important with market orders because they tend to be filled quickly, but it can be an important consideration for other order types, such as limit orders. The two most common order timing options are day only and good-till-canceled.
Consider using the services of a financial planner or advisor. Many planners and advisors require that their clients have an investment portfolio of at least a minimum value, sometimes $100,000 or more. This means it could be hard to find an advisor willing to work with you if your portfolio isn't well established. In that case, look for an advisor interested in helping smaller investors.
One such full-service broker when you’re ready to trade up is Fidelity. One of the largest financial firms in the world, Fidelity has it all — every conceivable investment choice and a long history of top caliber customer service to support it. For example, Fidelity offers one of the lowest trade commissions in the industry — $7.95 per equity transaction — as well as access to more than 4,700 funds. Other Broker you may consider are E*TRADE, Merrill Edge and TD Ameritrade, here’s a fast comparison between the three:
Consider whether or not to short sell. This can be a "hedging" strategy, but it can also amplify your risk, so it's really suitable only for experienced investors. The basic concept is as follows: Instead of betting that the price of a security is going to increase, "shorting" is a bet that the price will drop. When you short a stock (or bond or currency), your broker actually lends you shares without your having to pay for them. Then you hope the stock's price goes down. If it does, you "cover," meaning you buy the actual shares at the current (lower) price and give them to the broker. The difference between the amount credited to you in the beginning and the amount you pay at the end is your profit.
Investing is defined as “the outlay of money usually for income or profit.” The idea behind investing? Put your money to work for you in something you believe will increase in value over time. Investing your money in the stock market may seem like a foreign concept; how do you know which funds to invest in? How does trading actually work? And what the heck is a mutual fund?
For instance, if you purchased an S&P 500 ETF, you are only buying one “thing”. However, that ETF owns stock of all 500 companies in the S&P, meaning you effectively own small pieces of all 500 companies. Your investment would grow, or decline, with the S&P, and you would earn dividends based on your share of the dividend payouts from all 500 companies.
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Dave:                                    00:35                     All right folks, we’ll welcome to the Investing for Beginners podcast. This will be our podcast episode 100 Ooh; we made it. That’s awesome. All right, so today we’re going to talk about the basics of spinoffs and acquisitions, and we’re going to, we’ve talked a lot about these from the aspect of the company buying, but today we’re going to kind of go over some generalities of the other side. So the company that’s being acquired or spun off. So Andrew, why don’t you go ahead and take us off. I know we have a listener question regarding this as well as some are our general thoughts on this.
This is where the fun begins, but you need to think things through carefully before you take the plunge. Firstly, you have to take a look at your personal finances and see if this is the right decision for you. Do you have savings set aside that you want to start earning money from? Are you in a comfortable financial position that doesn’t rely on the success of your stock marketing investments? If you want to invest in stocks purely as a source of primary income, then you’re going about things in the wrong way. This isn’t the article for you, this is about investing in stocks for beginners that are already financially stable and don’t depend on their investments.
If you’re on a tight budget, try to invest just one percent of your salary into the retirement plan available to you at work. The truth is, you probably won’t even miss a contribution that small. You'll also get a tax deduction, which will make the contribution even less painful. Once you're comfortable with a one percent contribution, maybe you can increase it as you get annual raises. You won't likely miss the additional contributions
Mutual funds. Mutual funds are similar to ETFs; they're both bundles of stocks with subtle differences. For instance, ETFs trade throughout the trading day and mutual funds trade at the end of the day at the net asset value price. The main differentiator: ETFs generally have lower management fees and commissions than mutual funds. Mutual funds (and some ETFs) also often require at least $1,000 to get started and many have a higher minimum. However, some mutual funds can be found for $1,000 or less, like T. Rowe Price and Vanguard.
One of the keys to investing money to build wealth is by saving more money to invest. By increasing your amount invested on an automatic and yearly basis you will create discipline and consistency without having to remember on your own. It is a great strategy to use when starting out, when you have limited knowledge about how to add to your investments. In the long term, you will wake up one day and be surprised how much money you have in your account. A fundamental truth of Investing 101 is to start as early as possible and keep increasing how much you invest every year. Then you will be on your way to creating lasting wealth. Start today and open an account!
Invest in companies that you understand. Perhaps you have some basic knowledge regarding some business or industry. Why not put that to use? Invest in companies or industries that you know, because you're more likely to understand revenue models and prospects for future success. Of course, never put all your eggs in one basket: investing in only one -- or a very few -- companies can be quite risky. However, wringing value out of a single industry (whose workings you understand) will increase your chances of being successful.
Tip: Have $500 or more to invest with a knowledge of how to invest? Consider Wealthfront. They are another robo-advisor that offers low trading fees. With Wealthfront, you can save for retirement, college, or standard investments. They waive the trading fees for the first $10,000 you invest, but do have a $500 minimum balance required. Keep in mind, though Wealthfront only offers digital account management. There are no humans providing advice or answering questions.

Knowing how to secure your financial well-being is one of the most important things you’ll ever need in life. You don’t have to be a genius to do it. You just need to know a few basics, form a plan, and be ready to stick to it. There is no guarantee that you’ll make money from investments you make. But if you get the facts about saving and investing and follow through with an intelligent plan, you should be able to gain financial security over the years and enjoy the benefits of managing your money. For more information, SEC’s publication Saving and Investing: A Roadmap To Your Financial Security Through Saving and Investing.
When it comes to investing in stocks, you can either buy and sell shares yourself (self-directed investing) or you can use an advisor and have your money managed for you (managed investing). Way back when (early 1900s), you had to use a licensed professional known as a stock broker to place stock trades on your behalf. Thanks to the Internet, investors around the globe now invest for themselves using an online brokerage account. Today, "stock broker" is just another name for an online brokerage account.
You will want to build a solid foundation for your investments. This includes having a large base of stocks. One of the easiest places to start if you only have enough for one investment is to purchase a mutual fund or ETF in the S&P500. This provides access to the largest 500 companies in the United States. Then, you can branch out into other investments such as the Total US Stock Market Index and the Total International Stock Market Index. However, diversification is not only within stocks but also though different asset classes such as Bonds and international stocks/bonds. Always, consult a professional to create an investment portfolio tailored to your needs.

Before you begin investing, you need an overall framework for understanding the stock market. Ours is simple: We believe that the best way to invest your money in stocks is to buy great companies and hold them for the long term. The best investments don't need you to check on them daily because they are solid companies with competitive advantages and strong leadership. Patience is the secret to investing and making money grow.
One important principle to enact no matter your financial goals is diversification. When you diversify, you invest in multiple sectors of the market to protect yourself from sharp declines. This could constitute buying both domestic and foreign securities and combining risky and safe investments in percentages that best align with your risk tolerance.
One is Acorns, which rounds up your purchases on linked debit or credit cards and invests the change in a diversified portfolio of ETFs. On that end, it works like a robo-advisor, managing that portfolio for you. There is no minimum to open an Acorns account, and the service will start investing for you once you’ve accumulated at least $5 in round-ups. You can also make lump-sum deposits.
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