If you’re wondering how to invest in stocks online, we’ve got some good news for you – it’s easier than ever. You can open either an IRA, brokerage account, micro investing service, or other investment account type. You may want to consider the tax implications for the type of investing account you set up. For example, IRA accounts may be best for retirement while a taxable brokerage account is generally more flexible and may provide more investment options. You will also want to look into which investment products (stocks, mutual funds or ETFs) can be purchased with the type of account you open. Plus, as you build your wealth, a taxable brokerage with Ally Invest (formerly Trade King) can be used for investing more than your maximum yearly contribution. Alternatively, Betterment is a great option that can manage it for you. If you’d like to invest online, these stocks 101 tools help you to build knowledge and confidence.
How much liquidity (i.e. resources that can easily be converted to cash) do you need for your shorter-term goals and to maintain a proper cash reserve? Don't invest in stocks until you have at least six to twelve months of living expenses in a savings account as an emergency fund in case you lose your job. If you have to liquidate stocks after holding them less than a year, you're merely speculating, not investing.
These extra fees are another big cost to investors, but they aren’t deducted from your account balance. Instead, these fees show up in the price on the ticker tape. That’s why many high-priced mutual funds’ and ETFs’ value per share doesn’t seem to change over time — any growth is offset by fees. Also watch out for mutual funds that charge a front- or back-end load for each purchase or sale. These usually range from 0.5% to 1% and can add up quickly. Warren Buffett: Investment Advice & Strategy - #MentorMeWarren
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