How much money should I invest in stocks? If you’re investing through funds — have we mentioned this is our preference? — you can allocate a fairly large portion of your portfolio toward stock funds, especially if you have a long time horizon. A 30-year-old investing for retirement might have 80% of his or her portfolio in stock funds; the rest would be in bond funds. Individual stocks are another story. We’d recommend keeping these to 10% or less of your investment portfolio.


Do not day-trade, swing-trade, or otherwise trade stocks for very short-term profits. Remember, the more frequently you trade, the more commissions you incur, which will reduce any gains you make. Also, short-term gains are taxed more heavily than long-term (more than one-year) gains. The best reason to avoid ultra-short-term trades is that success in that area requires a great deal of skill, knowledge and nerve, to say nothing of luck. It is not for the inexperienced.


ETFs, on the other hand, trade like stocks, making them easy to add to your investment portfolio. There are no minimums for these securities, though their strategies vary equally. Many ETFs follow well known indexes from the S&P 500 or the Dow Jones Industrial Average. Others track collections of stocks that concentrate on industries like healthcare, technology or materials.
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In other words, you had a high margin of safety. It isn’t enough to buy great companies – you also have to buy them at a price that gives you a good margin of safety if you want to reduce the potential for loss as much as possible. As Rule #1 investors, we like to buy companies with a margin of safety that all but guarantees a 15% annual return over the next ten year period so that your money will double every ten years.

These funds could own a mixture of government bonds, high-rated corporate bonds, and foreign bonds. The most significant difference between holding an individual bond and a bond ETF is when you are paid interest. Bonds only make interest payments every six months. But bond ETFs make payments every month, as all the bonds the fund owns may pay interest at different times of the year.


Traditional advisors: Having a professional oversee your investments can help you keep your sights set on long-term goals, so you might want to consider hiring a financial planner. If you plan to hire one, make sure he is a fee-only financial advisor. A fee-only advisor doesn’t earn commissions based on product sales, meaning he has fewer conflicts of interest and can provide more comprehensive advice.
Something that might be confusing for new investors is that real estate can also be traded like a stock. Usually, this happens through a corporation that qualifies as a real estate investment trust, or REIT. For example, you can invest in hotel REITs and collect your share of the revenue from guests checking into the hotels and resorts that make up the company's portfolio. There are many different kinds of REITs; apartment complex REITs, office building REITs, storage unit REITs, REITs that specialize in senior housing, and even parking garage REITs. The World's Worst Stock Investment Advice
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