First, assuming you're not self-employed, the best course of action is probably going to be to sign up for a 401(k), 403(b), or other employer-sponsored retirement plans as quickly as possible. Most employers offer some sort of matching money up to a certain limit. For example, if your employer offers a 100 percent match on the first 3 percent of salary, and you earn $50,000 per year, that means on the first $1,500 you have withheld from your paycheck and put into your retirement account, your employer will deposit into your retirement account an additional $1,500 in tax-free money.

As with any investment strategy, you need to give yourself a budget for your stock investments. If you’re just getting started, maybe you’ll make this budget based on some extra money you have. The stock market and the individual stocks you pick can go up, but they can also go down. Any investment has risks, and you might lose some money. It’s always advisable not to put all your eggs in one basket.
Put simply: Buying stocks online is easy, and yet it’s incredibly complicated to do it well. It’s almost always the best idea to let a professional handle it. With the current level of technology, you don’t need to even pick a professional — you can pick a program that a professional designed. That’s going to help you to grow a significant retirement nest egg, provided that you can leave the money sitting in your account long enough.
Exchange-traded funds (ETFs) and mutual funds share many characteristics, but they have a few distinct differences. A mutual fund is a literal company that pools the funds of investors to employ a predetermined investment strategy. Some invest in a selection of stocks or bonds, while others track certain indexes. These funds usually employ minimum investments of $3,000 or more, though some drop that number to as low as $500.
Select your investments. Your "risk and return" objectives will eliminate some of the vast number of options. As an investor, you can choose to purchase stock from individual companies, such as Apple or McDonalds. This is the most basic type of investing. A bottom-up approach occurs when you buy and sell each stock independently based on your projections of their future prices and dividends. Investing directly in stocks avoids fees charged by mutual funds but requires more effort to ensure adequate diversification.
One disadvantage of a broker like Betterment is that investing in the account is limited. You buy into either a basket of stock-related ETFs, or a basket of bond ETFs. This is excellent when first starting out, but when you are ready to spread your capital around the investment universe, and particularly into individual stocks, you’ll need to look for a full-service broker to meet your needs.

Where to learn the jargon. Stocks come with their own language. There are things like "limit orders" that dictate buying at a certain price or "trading on margin" which is essentially borrowing money to purchase stocks. Jeff Reeves, executive editor of InvestorPlace, a resource for individual investors, says people shouldn't worry too much about the terms when they are starting out. Rather than try complicated transactions, new investors are best served by simply buying securities at market price. As people get comfortable with the basics, they can then branch out into more advanced trading scenarios.
If you’re wondering how to invest in stocks online, we’ve got some good news for you – it’s easier than ever. You can open either an IRA, brokerage account, micro investing service, or other investment account type. You may want to consider the tax implications for the type of investing account you set up. For example, IRA accounts may be best for retirement while a taxable brokerage account is generally more flexible and may provide more investment options. You will also want to look into which investment products (stocks, mutual funds or ETFs) can be purchased with the type of account you open. Plus, as you build your wealth, a taxable brokerage with Ally Invest (formerly Trade King) can be used for investing more than your maximum yearly contribution. Alternatively, Betterment is a great option that can manage it for you. If you’d like to invest online, these stocks 101 tools help you to build knowledge and confidence.
A limit order gives you more control over the price at which your trade is executed. If XYZ stock is trading at $100 a share and you think a $95 per-share price is more in line with how you value the company, your limit order tells your broker to hold tight and execute your order only when the ask price drops to that level. On the selling side, a limit order tells your broker to part with the shares once the bid rises to the level you set.

Before you begin investing, you need an overall framework for understanding the stock market. Ours is simple: We believe that the best way to invest your money in stocks is to buy great companies and hold them for the long term. The best investments don't need you to check on them daily because they are solid companies with competitive advantages and strong leadership. Patience is the secret to investing and making money grow.
Meanwhile, other passive investors may decide mutual funds are optimal. Mutual funds pool money from investors and use that money to buy holdings for its portfolio. As an investor, you own shares in the mutual fund. The fund's portfolio managers take care of all the investment decisions. For that privilege, the fund company charges an annual management fee to fund shareholders.
In addition to stock and bonds, you may want to consider alternative types of investments. The power of investing in alternative investments provides additional diversification to your portfolio. Stocks and bonds are becoming more correlated (linked) which increase the volatility of your investments – so relying on just one stock to invest in isn’t a good approach. Alternatives such as real estate investment trusts, currencies and gold and other investments provide.
Additionally, you should make sure to keep your expenses low, because  expenses can cut into your profits significantly. Watch for high fees from your broker and other internal expenses, and keep on top of current market trends through a trusted news source like InvestorPlace. Investment for beginners can be profitable and exciting. Trust InvestorPlace to provide you with the latest news in a variety of markets!
Investor Junkie is a financial publisher that does not offer any personal financial advice or advocate the purchase or sale of any security or investment for any specific individual. Members should be aware that investment markets have inherent risks, and past performance does not assure future results. Investor Junkie has advertising relationships with some of the offers listed on this website. Investor Junkie does attempt to take a reasonable and good faith approach to maintaining objectivity towards providing referrals that are in the best interest of readers. Investor Junkie strives to keep its information accurate and up to date. The information on Investor Junkie could be different from what you find when visiting a third-party website. All products are presented without warranty. For more information, please read our full disclaimer.
Popular financial goals include buying a home, paying for your child’s college, amassing a “rainy day” emergency fund, and saving for retirement. Rather than having a general goal such as “own a home,” set a specific goal: “Save $63,000 for a down-payment on a $311,000 house.” (Most home loans require a down payment of between 20% and 25% of the purchase price in order to attract the most affordable interest rate.) [3]
TD Ameritrade has been a powerful player in the online stock trading ecosystem for years. The flipside to such robust platforms: cost. Even though TD Ameritrade lowered its fees in 2017 from $9.99 to $6.95, pretty much every other major discount broker slashed its prices, too. TD Ameritrade remains one of the more expensive options out there, even with more than 100 commission-free ETFs. Though its pricing structure is more expensive than some of the other discount brokers, there are many traders who think its best-in-class trading platforms.
Choose where to open your account. There are different options available: you can go to a brokerage firm (sometimes also called a wirehouse or custodian) such as Fidelity, Charles Schwab or TD Ameritrade. You can open an account on the website of one of these institutions, or visit a local branch and choose to direct the investments on your own or pay to work with a staff advisor. You can also go directly to a fund company such as Vanguard, Fidelity, or T. Rowe Price and let them be your broker. They will offer you their own funds, of course, but many fund companies (such as the three just named) offer platforms on which you can buy the funds of other companies, too. See below for additional options in finding an advisor.
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A simplified look at a successful investment is one where an investor buys a company at X amount of dollars, holds on to the company for an extended period of time until its value has grown to the point that they feel comfortable selling it, and then sells it for a profit. If the company offers dividends, they may also accumulate profits along the way without having to sell any of their shares.

Some companies offer specialized portfolios for retirement investors. These are “asset allocation" or "target date" funds that automatically adjust their holdings based on your age. For example, your portfolio might be more heavily weighted towards equities when you are younger and automatically transfer more of your investments into fixed-income securities as you get older. In other words, they do for you what you might be expected to do yourself as you get older. [30] Be aware that these funds typically incur greater expenses than simple index funds and ETFs, but they perform a service the latter investments do not.


Another key thing to look at is a company's earnings per share, which represents the portion of a company's profit allocated to each share of its common stock. Earnings can cause stock prices to rise, and when they do, investors make money. If a company has high earnings per share, it means it has more money available to either grow the business or distribute as dividends. That said, earnings should always be evaluated in the context of the industry you're dealing with. If you're looking at a company whose earnings per share is $2, but a competing company has earnings per share of $6, that's a potential red flag. That said, this is only one piece of the total puzzle.  
First, assuming you're not self-employed, the best course of action is probably going to be to sign up for a 401(k), 403(b), or other employer-sponsored retirement plans as quickly as possible. Most employers offer some sort of matching money up to a certain limit. For example, if your employer offers a 100 percent match on the first 3 percent of salary, and you earn $50,000 per year, that means on the first $1,500 you have withheld from your paycheck and put into your retirement account, your employer will deposit into your retirement account an additional $1,500 in tax-free money.
Researching individual companies takes time, and sometimes, even if you perform your due diligence, you may come to find that a certain business has a bad year, gets nailed by a scandal, or experiences some other shakeup that causes its stock price to plummet. As an investor, that's clearly not good news. Therefore, when you think about buying stocks, it pays to load up on a wide range from a variety of industries in order to establish a diversified portfolio.And that's where investing in mutual funds can be advantageous.
These pooled mechanisms can take many forms. Some wealthy investors invest in hedge funds, but most individual investors will opt for vehicles like exchange-traded funds and index funds, which make it possible to buy diversified portfolios at much cheaper rates than they could have afforded on their own. The downside is a near total loss of control. If you invest in an ETF or mutual fund, you are along for the ride, outsourcing your decisions to a small group of people with the power to change your allocation.
Generally the longer the term of the bond, the higher the interest rate. If you're lending your money for a year, you probably won't get a high interest rate, because one year is a relatively short period of risk. If you're going to lend your money and not expect it back for ten years, however, you will be compensated for the higher risk you're taking, and the interest rate will be higher. This illustrates an axiom in investing: The higher the risk, the higher the return.
Investing in stocks can be very costly if you trade constantly, especially with a minimum amount of money available to invest. Every time that you trade stock, either buying or selling, you will incur a trading fee. Trading fees range from the low end of $10 per trade, but can be as high as $30 for some discount brokers. Remember, a trade is an order to purchase shares in one company - if you want to purchase five different stocks at the same time, this is seen as five separate trades and you will be charged for each one.
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If you want to learn more about how to invest in a stock, check out the directory of Investing for Beginners articles I've written, sorted by topic or head over to my blog for more esoteric and advanced topics that aren't particularly appropriate for beginners. Whatever happens, remember that stocks are just one of many types of assets that you can use to build wealth and become financially independent. 
As a true beginner, I found this book rather frustrating. I liked that a minimal amount of time was spent on general investing advice, so that we could get right into stocks. At first I liked that this is a small book, 128 pages of content with a small page size and medium font, but soon realized that the information was packed too densely for me to be able to learn it. The bulk of the book is one equation on company statistics after another woven into a loose narrative. They said to follow along with the equations at home, but I would have needed more guidance than that, like a work book or at least some exercises. So the more I read, the more lost I got. I will, however, keep this as a reference book, as it has a good index, and I will be able to use it to look up terms and equations.
Leveraging allows you to use borrowed money from banks and brokerage firms to invest in stocks, but you must pay back the amount you borrow with interest. Although leveraging allows you to buy shares that you otherwise might not have access to, if the shares you buy drop in value you’ll be out a lot of money. In general, avoid leveraging because it increases your investment risk.
A Roth IRA, on the other hand, is funded with post-tax dollars. This means you’ve already paid your income tax, so when you withdraw it in retirement, you don’t pay income or capital gains tax. The money is all yours. Roth IRAs offer excellent tax benefits but are only available to certain income levels. If you make more than $135,000 a year as a single filer or over $199,000 as a married filer, you aren’t eligible for a Roth IRA.
In other words, you had a high margin of safety. It isn’t enough to buy great companies – you also have to buy them at a price that gives you a good margin of safety if you want to reduce the potential for loss as much as possible. As Rule #1 investors, we like to buy companies with a margin of safety that all but guarantees a 15% annual return over the next ten year period so that your money will double every ten years.
Dividend reinvestment programs are often coupled with cash investment options that resemble direct stock purchase plans so you can regularly have money withdrawn from your checking or savings account, or send in one-time payments whenever you feel like, perhaps as little as $25, buying more shares of stock in a business as you might purchase something from a mail-order catalog.
Investing for beginners starts with figuring out your financial goals – do you want short-term cash for something like a car, or do you want to invest your money long-term for something like a college fund? Your timeline will help you determine which financial vehicles you should consider, whether it is in the form of something like stocks, mutual funds or money market account. You should also decide whether you want to work with a professional broker or financial adviser who can help you create your financial portfolio. As with any financial decision, what you do with your money is ultimately up to you, so investing for beginners is something that you’ll be able to customize to best suit your financial goals.

Buy undervalued assets ("buy low, sell high"). If you're talking about stocks and other assets, you want to buy when the price is low and sell when the price is high. If you buy 100 shares of stock on January 1st for $5 per share, and you sell those same shares on December 31st for $7.25, you just made $225. That may seem a paltry sum, but when you're talking about buying and selling hundreds or even thousands of shares, it can really add up.
You can set up an account by depositing cash or stocks in a brokerage account. Firms like Charles Schwab and Citigroup’s Smith Barney unit offer brokerage accounts that can be managed online or with a broker in person. If you prefer buying and selling stocks online, you can use sites like E-Trade or Ameritrade. Those are just two of the most well-known electronic brokerages, but many large firms have online options as well.

Where Should You Invest Your Money in Stocks? – Where you invest depends on the goals brought up above. Assuming that you have already determined your goals and your tolerance for risk, look for stocks or stock mutual funds that match your criteria on growth, returns, dividends, etc. In general, stocks with higher rewards such as emerging markets, start-up companies, or technology companies come with higher risk.
Choose where to open your account. There are different options available: you can go to a brokerage firm (sometimes also called a wirehouse or custodian) such as Fidelity, Charles Schwab or TD Ameritrade. You can open an account on the website of one of these institutions, or visit a local branch and choose to direct the investments on your own or pay to work with a staff advisor. You can also go directly to a fund company such as Vanguard, Fidelity, or T. Rowe Price and let them be your broker. They will offer you their own funds, of course, but many fund companies (such as the three just named) offer platforms on which you can buy the funds of other companies, too. See below for additional options in finding an advisor.
Finally, the other factor: risk tolerance. The stock market goes up and down, and if you’re prone to panicking when it does the latter, you’re better off investing slightly more conservatively, with a lighter allocation to stocks. Not sure? We have a risk tolerance quiz — and more information about how to make this decision — in our article about what to invest in.
The next best way to buy stock without a broker is to enroll in a stock's dividend reinvestment program or DRIP. Some of the reasons you should consider investing through a DRIP can be found in the linked story, but it would also be helpful to revisit them here so you understand the appeal. DRIPs allow you to take cash dividends paid out by the company you own and plow them back into buying more shares, charging either nominal fees or nothing at all depending upon the specifics of the individual plan.

Since stocks are highly volatile but have the most return potential, they are more appropriate for younger investors. In contrast, bonds are designed for predictability, making them better for older investors with lower risk tolerance. Cash investments are typically not a good idea unless you have lots of near-term liquidity needs. Determining the appropriate asset allocation for your investment strategy is a critical step to take.
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Like many new investors, you've decided to invest in a company and pick up your first shares of stock, but your limited knowledge leaves you wondering how to do it. Don't worry! This overview was designed to help you learn precisely that - how to invest in stocks. To be more specific, for you new investors, this page was put together to serve as an introductory depository of investment articles designed to get many of the basics out of the way before moving on to some of the more advanced topics which I've written over the past years.

Although people may be eager to own a piece of Apple (ticker: AAPL) or Microsoft Corp. (MSFT), new investors should remember they don't have to buy individual stocks if they want money in the market. "I'm a big believer in index funds," says Adam Bergman, a senior tax partner with IRA Financial Group. "They do a really good job for the novice investor."
If you wanted a single investment that has you covered from a performance and diversity standpoint you could always go with something like a Vanguard Lifecycle fund and pay as low as 0.15% in fees and that’s it. On a side note, we have a list of our favorite Vanguard funds and investments for beginners that you should probably check out if you know what’s good for you. 
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