Margin accounts -- A margin account allows you to use borrowed money to invest. Typically, investors who use margin accounts can borrow up to 50% of the value of the investment. Thus, to buy $5,000 of stock, an investor would only have to put up $2,500 of cash, and borrow the other $2,500 from the broker. We don’t think margin accounts are particularly good choices for beginning investors, because while using borrowed money can increase your returns, it also increases the risk you lose money. If you use margin and the investments you own decline in value, a broker can sell your investments without your authorization, potentially forcing you to sell at an inopportune time.
Figuring out how to invest in stocks starts with learning the fundamentals of investing. Once you are comfortable with how investing works, the next step is to choose the companies you wish to buy. This is the step that can make or break you as an investor, and we will cover later how you can go about choosing companies that will bring you success.

Sometimes, companies (often blue-chip firms) will sponsor a special type of program called a DSPP, or Direct Stock Purchase Plan. DSPPs were originally conceived generations ago as a way for businesses to let smaller investors buy ownership directly from the company. Participating in a DSPP requires an investor to engage with a company directly rather than a broker, but every company's system for administering a DSPP is unique. Most usually offer their DSPP through transfer agents or another third-party administrator. To learn more about how to participate in a company's DSPP, an investor should contact the company's investor relations department.

For example, you may hear plenty of positive news on a new technology stock. It is important to stay away until you understand the industry and how it works. The principle of investing in companies you understand was popularized by renowned investor Warren Buffett, who made billions of dollars sticking only with business models he understood and avoiding ones he did not.
Once you've learned the basics, and you've come up with your game plan, the next step is to open a brokerage account and put your plan into action. Be sure to shop around, as different brokerages charge different fees and offer different features. As a new investor, you'll want a brokerage which offers access to investment research and educational features, in order to help with stock selection and to answer any questions you might have along the way.
Before you begin investing, you need an overall framework for understanding the stock market. Ours is simple: We believe that the best way to invest your money in stocks is to buy great companies and hold them for the long term. The best investments don't need you to check on them daily because they are solid companies with competitive advantages and strong leadership. Patience is the secret to investing and making money grow.
Popular financial goals include buying a home, paying for your child’s college, amassing a “rainy day” emergency fund, and saving for retirement. Rather than having a general goal such as “own a home,” set a specific goal: “Save $63,000 for a down-payment on a $311,000 house.” (Most home loans require a down payment of between 20% and 25% of the purchase price in order to attract the most affordable interest rate.) [3]
One such full-service broker when you’re ready to trade up is Fidelity. One of the largest financial firms in the world, Fidelity has it all — every conceivable investment choice and a long history of top caliber customer service to support it. For example, Fidelity offers one of the lowest trade commissions in the industry — $7.95 per equity transaction — as well as access to more than 4,700 funds. Other Broker you may consider are E*TRADE, Merrill Edge and TD Ameritrade, here’s a fast comparison between the three:
Dividend yields provide an idea of the cash dividend expected from an investment in a stock. Dividend Yields can change daily as they are based on the prior day's closing stock price. There are risks involved with dividend yield investing strategies, such as the company not paying a dividend or the dividend being far less that what is anticipated. Furthermore, dividend yield should not be relied upon solely when making a decision to invest in a stock. An investment in high yield stock and bonds involve certain risks such as market risk, price volatility, liquidity risk, and risk of default.
How can a Roth IRA grow like this? By compound interest. The return on your investment, as well as reinvested interest, dividends and capital gains, are added to your original investment such that any given rate of return will produce a larger profit through accelerated growth. If you are earning an average compound annual rate of return of 7.2%, your money will double in ten years. (This is known as "the rule of 72.")
For example, depending on your age and risk tolerance, you might want to have some of your portfolio invested in bond funds, growth and income funds, and international funds. You may also want to consider high dividend stocks among your individual stock holdings. Income earning securities tend to be less volatile than pure growth stocks, particularly in bear markets. You’ll want to develop a balance between your growth assets, and your income- or growth and income-holdings.
Robo-advisors: A robo-advisor is an online wealth management service that offers investment advice based on algorithms. A robo-advisor takes human financial planners out of the equation. Although you’re liable to spend less on fees with a robo-advisor, don’t expect to receive advice on personal wealth management issues, like dealing with your taxes.
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