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Investing in mutual funds — collections of stocks chosen by a professional money manager and owned by a large group of investors — whether through your online broker or your retirement account, is one way to leave it to the pros. But even mutual funds present problems. Some funds charge high fees that eat into your returns, and, truthfully, most fund managers are no better equipped to beat the market than anyone else.
Investing in the stock market is a great way to build your wealth, but for those of us who aren't professional stockbrokers, knowing what information to trust and where to put your money can seem overwhelming. Stock Market Investing for Beginners provides you with the strategic advice and knowledge necessary to make informed investment decisions. Equipping you with everything you need to take control of your financial future, Stock Market Investing for Beginners removes the guesswork from investing.
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Investing in mutual funds — collections of stocks chosen by a professional money manager and owned by a large group of investors — whether through your online broker or your retirement account, is one way to leave it to the pros. But even mutual funds present problems. Some funds charge high fees that eat into your returns, and, truthfully, most fund managers are no better equipped to beat the market than anyone else.
It’s important to consider transaction costs and fees when choosing your investments. Costs and fees can eat into your returns and reduce your gains. It is vital to know what costs you will be liable for when you purchase, hold, or sell stock. Common transaction costs for stocks include commissions, bid-ask spread, slippage, SEC Section 31 fees [31], and capital gains tax. For funds, costs may include management fees, sales loads, redemption fees, exchange fees, account fees, 12b-1 fees, and operating expenses. [32]
However, the other option is to buy individual stocks, and that brings both more risk and more potential reward. If you pick a great stock, it can soar over time and produce immense returns. If you choose the wrong stock, you can lose your entire investment. That's why building a diversified portfolio with multiple stocks is a must in order to protect against an unforeseen event that could hit one of your stocks hard.
Something that might be confusing for new investors is that real estate can also be traded like a stock. Usually, this happens through a corporation that qualifies as a real estate investment trust, or REIT. For example, you can invest in hotel REITs and collect your share of the revenue from guests checking into the hotels and resorts that make up the company's portfolio. There are many different kinds of REITs; apartment complex REITs, office building REITs, storage unit REITs, REITs that specialize in senior housing, and even parking garage REITs. The World's Worst Stock Investment Advice
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