The capital gains tax rate favors long-term investments. An investor who buys and sells their stocks within a few months will face a higher capital gains tax rate (25 percent) on their profits than an investor who buys and holds their stocks for a full year (15 percent). The larger your investment, the bigger the difference. Granted, there’s a risk to holding an investment for longer, but if you’re close to that one-year cutoff, it might be worth it to sit tight for a few more weeks.
Other ways of gaining exposure to real estate include collateralized mortgage obligations (CMOs) and collateralized debt obligations (CDOs), which are mortgages that have been bundled into securitized instruments. These, however, are tools for sophisticated investors: their transparency and quality can vary greatly, as revealed during the 2008 downturn.
The easiest option is to buy what's known as an ETF (an exchange-traded fund) like SPY (SPY). It trades like a stock, but it means you own a basket of stocks. In the case of SPY, the basket is made up of 500 of America's largest companies. Sure, a few might struggle, but all 500 probably aren't going to tank at the same time, so it helps lower the risk.
One of the keys to investing money to build wealth is by saving more money to invest. By increasing your amount invested on an automatic and yearly basis you will create discipline and consistency without having to remember on your own. It is a great strategy to use when starting out, when you have limited knowledge about how to add to your investments. In the long term, you will wake up one day and be surprised how much money you have in your account. A fundamental truth of Investing 101 is to start as early as possible and keep increasing how much you invest every year. Then you will be on your way to creating lasting wealth. Start today and open an account!
Since Betterment launched, other robo-first companies have been founded, and established online brokers like Charles Schwab have added robo-like advisory services. If you want an algorithm to make investment decisions for you, including tax-loss harvesting and rebalancing, a roboadvisor may be for you. And as the success of index investing has shown, if your goal is long-term wealth building, you might do better with a roboadvisor.

Pragmatically, you should weigh the dollar amount you have available to invest against the actual costs of creating a diversified portfolio. Brokerage commissions for buying and selling stocks and exchange-traded funds (ETFs) increase significantly on a percentage basis as the dollar amount invested decreases. Mutual funds, conversely, charge a flat percentage fee. Commission-free ETFs, which are offered by some brokerage firms (including Charles Schwab, Fidelity and TD Ameritrade) are even more advantageous from a cost standpoint.
Tax Shelters: Retirement plans like 401(k)s or Roth IRAs offer numerous tax benefits. Some are tax-deferred, which (usually) means you get a tax deduction at the time you deposit the capital into the account, and then pay taxes in the future, allowing you year after year of tax-deferred growth. Others are tax-free, meaning you fund them with after-tax dollars (read: you don't get a tax deduction), but you'll never pay taxes on either the investment profits generated within the account nor on the money once you withdraw it later in life. Good tax planning, especially early in your career, can mean a lot of extra wealth down the road as the benefits compound upon themselves.
The decision between a high-risk, high-return investment strategy and a low-risk, low-return strategy should depend, in part, on your investing time frame. Conventional wisdom states that the farther you are from retirement, the more risk you can afford to take. That means a stock-heavy portfolio in your 20s, when you can afford to chase returns. Then, even if your portfolio takes a hit during a recession when you’re in your 30s, you’ll have time to make up your losses before you retire. By the same logic, the closer you are to retirement, the more you likely want to focus on preserving your gains and avoiding too much risk.
If you build the right portfolio you can set up a wealth building machine! It doesn’t happen overnight but you can build a portfolio that can provide a 10% annual rate of return and pay you dividend along the way. When you choose to leverage the dividend re-investing program (DRIP), you put compound growth on autopilot and if you have dividend growth stocks such as the Dividend Ambassadors, you have an accelerated growth.
While a limit order guarantees the price you’ll get if the order is executed, there’s no guarantee that the order will be filled fully, partially or even at all. Limit orders are placed on a first-come, first-served basis, and only after market orders are filled, and only if the stock stays within your set parameters long enough for the broker to execute the trade.

Invest in a Roth IRA as soon in your working career as possible. If you're earning taxable income and you're at least 18, you can establish a Roth IRA. This is a retirement account to which you can contribute up to an IRS-determined maximum each year (the latest limit is the lesser of $5,500 or the amount earned plus an additional $1,000 "catch up" contribution for those age 50 or older). This money gets invested and begins to grow. A Roth IRA can be a very effective way to save for retirement.


Picking specific stocks can be complicated, so consider investing in an index fund, which mirrors the performance of an entire stock market index. An index fund is a good option for new investors because it provides diversification, or a way to reduce investing risk by owning a range of assets across a variety of industries, company sizes and geographic areas. Research has shown that index funds, which are “passively managed” funds, perform better than actively managed funds, which have a fund manager choosing specific stocks and bonds in an attempt to outperform the market.


Investing is the one place where a “head in the sand” strategy might be the smartest method. Set up auto deposits into your investment accounts each month and only look at your portfolio once every three to six months. This reduces the likelihood of panic selling when the market falls or piling in more money when everything seems like rainbows and butterflies.
When you elect to contribute to a 401(k), the money will go directly from your paycheck into the account without ever making it to your bank. Most 401(k) contributions are made pretax. Some 401(k)s today will place your funds by default in a target-date fund — more on those below — but you may have other choices. Here’s how to invest in your 401(k).

John Jagerson is a CFA and CMT charter holder and a founder of Learning Markets, which provides analysis and education for individual and professional investors. He is an author or co-author of five books on investing, currencies, bonds, and stocks. John has appeared in outlets like Forbes.com, BBC Radio, Nasdaq.com, and CBS for his financial strategy expertise. After graduating with a B.S. in Business from Utah Valley University, John completed the PLD program at Harvard Business School. Once the markets close each day, he can be found back on his mountain bike or in his running shoes on the trails of the Wasatch Mountains near his home.


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"Here's the trap for the new person," Seiden says. "They will focus on the stocks where the news is good, but by the time they get the news, everyone else [in the know] has already bought it." This cycle means new investors are often buying when prices are highest. A better route is to watch a stock price and buy when it's down, a tactic Seiden encourages as a way to buy shares at a sale price.
Do you know what to look for when it comes to stocks, bonds, mutual funds, ETFs, and so on? Do you understand the terminology and how to react to certain trends? Is the company you’re investing in worthwhile, with a dependable financial history and sustainable cash flow? These are just some of the factors you should be researching before you actually put any money on the table.
Trusts or Other Asset Protection Mechanisms: Another way to hold your investments is through entities or structures such as trust funds. There are some major planning and asset protection benefits of using these special ownership methods, especially if you want to restrict how your capital is used in some way. And if you have a lot of operating assets or real estate investments, you may want to speak to your attorney about setting up a holding company.

Consider this: The average length of a job search is 40 weeks. For every week you're unemployed, you're missing out on each day's pay you aren't earning over a five-day work week. Studies have found that a professionally written resume is guaranteed to get you more interviews to land the job you want, faster. Even if this shortens your job search by just a day or two, you've made your money back, and then some. Think of it as an investment in your earning power.
To the inexperienced investor, investing may seem simple enough - all you need to do is go to a brokerage firm and open up an account, right? What you may not know, however, is that all financial institutions have minimum deposit requirements. In other words, they won't accept your account application unless you deposit a certain amount of money. With a sum as small as $1,000, some firms won't allow you to open an account.
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