The next best way to buy stock without a broker is to enroll in a stock's dividend reinvestment program or DRIP. Some of the reasons you should consider investing through a DRIP can be found in the linked story, but it would also be helpful to revisit them here so you understand the appeal. DRIPs allow you to take cash dividends paid out by the company you own and plow them back into buying more shares, charging either nominal fees or nothing at all depending upon the specifics of the individual plan.
When Should You Invest in Stocks? – Obviously, the stock market rises and falls. However, as noted above, it will almost certainly provide you with higher returns over time than other investments. Consequently, you should normally be invested in stocks. Trying to time when the best moment is to enter or exit the market is nearly impossible, even for professional investors. Therefore, the best time to invest in stocks is generally today.
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Andrew:                              01:08                     Yeah, sure. So I think when you talk about stock picks from the past, it’s much more useful to talk about your mistakes rather than your successes. Um, we can, we can all buy stock. I can go out for a multitude of reasons, but you know, if you can look at how you kinda messed up and maybe you can avoid that in the future and maybe some people can kind of recognize a situation like this and maybe stay clear or in the case of, of my, like my personal kind of experience with this and the way that maybe I wish I would have played it is I would have waited longer to, to get into this stock because it was clear that the fallout from the stock hadn’t completely finished. And so I’m keeping this stock on my radar and I’m watching to see how it progresses.
What are ETFs? ETFs trade on the stock exchange, just like regular stocks. However, they are comprised of more than one stock, bond, futures, or foreign asset. They allow you to trade an entire market, such as the S&P 500 with one single fund. You can trade them as often as you want throughout the day. This is unlike mutual funds, which only trade once the market has closed for the day.

Let's start with this basic truth: At its core, investing is about laying out money today with the expectation of getting more money back in the future — which, accounting for time, adjusting for risk, and factoring in inflation, results in a satisfactory compound annual growth rate, particularly as compared to standards considered a "good" investment.
A "record date" is the date a dividend distribution is declared, the date at the close of which one must be the shareholder in order to receive the declared dividend. An "ex-dividend date" is typically two business days before the record date. When shares of a stock are sold near the record date of a dividend declaration, the ex-dividend date is the last day on which the seller is clearly entitled to the dividend payment.
Notice: Information contained herein is not and should not be construed as an offer, solicitation, or recommendation to buy or sell securities. The information has been obtained from sources we believe to be reliable; however no guarantee is made or implied with respect to its accuracy, timeliness, or completeness. Authors may own the stocks they discuss. The information and content are subject to change without notice.
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When looking for an advisor, choose one who charges you a flat fee for advice, not one who is paid a commission by the vendor of an investment product. A fee-based advisor will retain you as a happy client only if his/her advice works out well for you. A commission-based advisor's success is based on selling you a product, regardless of how well that product performs for you.

How you implement these strategies depends on your personal preferences and appetite for risk. Some investors prefer one strategy and concentrate on finding a diverse set of stocks all of which embrace that particular philosophy. Others instead choose to use multiple strategies in their efforts to diversify their portfolios, and that can involve owning several different kinds of stocks. Either method can produce the long-term results you want as long as you're comfortable with the overall investing plan you choose and stick with it.

As with stocks, many fixed-income securities are purchased through a brokerage account. Selecting your broker will require you to choose between either a discount or full-service model. When opening a new brokerage account, the minimum investment can vary, usually ranging from $500 to $1,000; often even lower for IRAs, or education accounts. Alternatively, you can work with a registered investment advisor or asset management company that operates on a fiduciary basis.
As with any investment strategy, you need to give yourself a budget for your stock investments. If you’re just getting started, maybe you’ll make this budget based on some extra money you have. The stock market and the individual stocks you pick can go up, but they can also go down. Any investment has risks, and you might lose some money. It’s always advisable not to put all your eggs in one basket.
An online brokerage account likely offers your quickest and least expensive path to buying stocks, funds and a variety of other investments. With a broker, you can open an individual retirement account, also known as an IRA — here are our top picks for IRA accounts — or you can open a taxable brokerage account if you’re already saving adequately for retirement elsewhere.
Shares of ETFs are bought and sold in the market at a market price, which may differ from NAV. Investors selling ETF shares in the market may receive less than NAV. Investors buying and selling ETF shares at market price may pay brokerage commissions, which will reduce returns. Market returns are based upon the closing price, which is generally at 4:00 p.m. ET and do not represent the returns you would receive if you traded shares at other times. Investors may acquire ETF shares and tender them for redemption in Creation Unit Aggregations only. Individual ETF shares are not redeemable.

Put broadly, investing is the creation of more money through the use of capital. Essentially, when you invest, you offer your money to people and organizations who have an immediate use for it, and in exchange, they give you a share of the money that they earn with this funding. There are different types of investments — including stocks, bonds and real estate — and each comes with its own level of risk.


Investing in the stock market is a do-it-yourself way to plan for a comfortable old age. There will be ups and downs in the market, of course, but investing young means you have decades to ride them out. It’s also important because benefits from Social Security account for only around 38% of U.S. seniors’ income, according to the Social Security Administration. That figure may well decline in the coming decades because Social Security has been paying out more to retirees than it has been taking in from taxes paid by workers.
In third place, earning a recommendation based on its platform alone, is E*TRADE. E*TRADE's web-based trading platform, Power E*TRADE, is a great environment for any beginner stock trader. It's easy to navigate, fast, and includes usability upgrades perfect for new investors like paper (practice) trading. Use E*TRADE's website to conduct research, watch educational videos, and read a large selection of articles covering the full spectrum of investment-related topics. Read full review
Online brokers make it painless to enter an order and place a trade to buy stocks. Once you have a brokerage account, you’ll just need to know the stock’s ticker symbol to place the trade. A ticker symbol is one to five letters in length, and identifies the specific stock you want to trade. For example, Amazon’s ticker is AMZN. Nike’s is NKE. Ford’s is F. And so on.
Invest in companies that you understand. Perhaps you have some basic knowledge regarding some business or industry. Why not put that to use? Invest in companies or industries that you know, because you're more likely to understand revenue models and prospects for future success. Of course, never put all your eggs in one basket: investing in only one -- or a very few -- companies can be quite risky. However, wringing value out of a single industry (whose workings you understand) will increase your chances of being successful.
Dave:                                    00:36                     All right folks, welcome to the Investing for Beginners podcast. This is episode 99 tonight we are going to talk about a stock that Andrew recently had some bad walk with and has sold. And we’re going to talk a little bit about some of the lessons that he learned from his investment with this company, including things like activist investors, divestitures and board resignations, and how those can affect what happens with a stock. So Andrew, why don’t you go ahead and tell us about the company and a little bit about your experience.
Commodities are goods such as metals and grains that are traded through futures contracts. A futures contract is an agreement to buy or sell a specific quantity of a commodity at a specified price on a specified date in the future. Commodities trading is vulnerable to fraud, so be sure to check that the individual and firm you are investing with are registered.
Understand that for both beginning investors and seasoned stock market pros, it's impossible to always buy and sell the best stocks at exactly the right time. But also understand that you don't have to be right every time to make money. You just need to learn some basic rules for how to identify the best stocks to watch, the ideal time to buy them, and when to sell stocks to lock in your profits or quickly cut any losses.
However, do not equate the ease of opening an account with the ease of making good investment decisions. It is generally recommended that beginners speak to a qualified financial advisor. New investors should read "The Intelligent Investor" by Benjamin Graham. Smart investing can be highly satisfying so take it slow, do your research, and seek out an advisor that has your best interests in mind.
E*TRADE credits and offers may be subject to U.S. withholding taxes and reporting at retail value. Taxes related to these credits and offers are the customer’s responsibility. Offer valid for one new E*TRADE Securities non-retirement brokerage account opened by 12/31/2019 and funded within 60 days of account opening with $10,000 or more. Cash credits for eligible deposits or transfers of new funds or securities from accounts outside of E*TRADE will be made as follows: $1,000,000 or more will receive $2,500; $500,000–$999,999 will receive $1,200; $250,000–$499,999 will receive $600; $100,000–$249,999 will receive $300; $25,000–$99,999 will receive $200. New funds or securities must: be deposited or transferred within 60 days of enrollment in offer, be from accounts outside of E*TRADE, and remain in the account (minus any trading losses) for a minimum of six months or the credit may be surrendered. The credit will appear in your account within one week of the close of the 60-day window. Multiple deposits made to eligible accounts will be aggregated and will receive a credit on a pro-rata basis once the new account has been funded with at least $10,000. An account funded within 60 days of account open, with a minimum deposit of $10,000 will receive up to 500 commission-free stock and options trades executed within 60 days of the deposited funds being made available for investment in the new account (excluding options contract fees). You will pay $6.95 for your first 29 stock or options trades (plus 75¢ per options contract) and $4.95 thereafter up to 500 stock or options trades (plus 50¢ per options contract). Your account will be credited for trades within a week of the executed trade, after paying the applicable commission charge. You will not receive cash compensation for any unused free trade commissions. Excludes current E*TRADE Financial Corporation associates, non-U.S. residents, and any jurisdiction where this offer is not valid. This offer is not valid for retirement or E*TRADE Bank accounts. One promotion per customer. E*TRADE Securities reserves the right to terminate this offer at any time. Must be enrolled by December 31, 2019, the offer expiration date.
Dollar cost averaging is the process of buying into your investment positions gradually, rather than all at once. For example, rather than investing $5,000 in a single index fund, you can make periodic contributions of say, $100 per month into the fund. By doing this, you remove the possibility of buying at the top of the market. Rather, you’re buying into the fund at all different times and on a continuous basis. This also removes the “when” question, as in when to invest in a given security or fund.
Sell for a profit. Flipping isn't just for houses. You can flip products too. If you have a seasoned eye for hot items at estate sales or on Craigslist, go for it. Take your $100 and buy those items. Turn around and sell them for a profit and you have an instant return. This is a great side hustle gig as it doesn't take a lot of time and has very little overhead. You can do this in your free time, while still making your full-time income.
Invest in ETFs. Mutual funds usually aren't an option with just $100. They often require much larger initial investments. Enter ETFs. They combine a variety of securities into one investment. They often don't charge annual maintenance fees. But, you do pay a trading fee when you buy or sell them. We recommend sticking with ETFs that track index funds, such as the S&P 500.
Let’s say you’re interested in investing in Nike. If you look that up, the stock symbol is NKE on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE). The first number you’ll probably notice on any financial news site with a stock tracker is the current share price. In the United States, this is measured in dollars and cents, but the units may vary depending on where in the world you’re investing. In London, for example, they measure stock prices in pence.
CONSISTENT DIVIDEND GROWTH is what has been working. I did start with high yield stock and it was nice to see the dividend income but my total portfolio growth was not where it should have been. What can I say? I was a newbie dividend investor and I wanted to generate retirement income from my portfolio and that’s what I was doing – only generating income and not growing my portfolio. In my strive to become a better investor, I stumbled upon the 10% dividend growth, the chowder rule, and the total return value of a portfolio. Let me show you why those 3 concepts matter.

Cash accounts -- This is the most basic type of brokerage account. Investors who use a cash account have to pay the full amount for any investments purchased. Thus, if you want to buy $5,000 of stock, you’ll have to have $5,000 in your account (plus any commissions to place the trade). Some brokers automatically sign up customers for a cash account, and “upgrade” the account to another type if a client requests it later.
If you already have a firm handle on your investment strategy and want to maximize your profits, OptionsHouse is excellent. What it lacks in some of the investor education features that competitors like TD Ameritrade can claim, it makes up with its low-cost, streamlined trading platform. Like Ally Invest, it’s been a longtime leader in rock-bottom pricing, with a $4.95 trade commission, and, unlike many brokerages catering to active investors, no account minimums or inactivity fees. Fees for a single-leg options contract are $5.45 all-in. Plus, if you have $5,000 to invest, you’ll receive $1,000 worth of commission-free trades.

The vertical ends of this box represent the movement of the stock between where it opened and where it closed. In some representations, upward movement on the day is shown by a green box, while a red box will represent a stock that ended the day lower than it started. If the graphic is black and white, a stock that was pushed up on the day by buyers will have its rectangle unfilled. If selling pressure pushed the stock lower, the same rectangle would be filled in.
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Because ETFs are traded like a stock, brokers often charge a commission to buy or sell them. But many brokers, including the ones on this list of the best ETF brokers, have a selection of commission-free ETFs. If you plan to regularly invest in an ETF — as many investors do, by making automatic investments each month or week — you should choose a commission-free ETF so you aren’t paying a commission each time. (Here’s some background about commissions and other investment fees.)
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