The goal of your financial adviser/broker is to keep you as a client so that they can continue to make money off of you. They tell you to diversify so that your portfolio follows the Dow and the S&P 500. That way, they will always have an excuse when it goes down in value. The average broker/adviser has very little knowledge of the underlying economics of business. Warren Buffett is famous for saying, "Risk is for people who don't know what they're doing."
In picking those individual stocks, there are many different yet equally promising strategies you can follow. Some investors concentrate on dividend-paying stocks to provide them with relative safety and security from their stock portfolio, along with regular income that they can use either to cover cash needs or to reinvest into buying additional shares of stock. Value investing involves finding underappreciated stocks whose prices are at a discount to the true intrinsic value of the underlying business, and well-known investors like Warren Buffett have used value-investing tenets to produce strong returns.
Picking specific stocks can be complicated, so consider investing in an index fund, which mirrors the performance of an entire stock market index. An index fund is a good option for new investors because it provides diversification, or a way to reduce investing risk by owning a range of assets across a variety of industries, company sizes and geographic areas. Research has shown that index funds, which are “passively managed” funds, perform better than actively managed funds, which have a fund manager choosing specific stocks and bonds in an attempt to outperform the market.
That’s because there are plenty of tools available to help you. One of the best is stock mutual funds, which are an easy and low-cost way for beginners to invest in the stock market. These funds are available within your 401(k), IRA or any taxable brokerage account. An S&P 500 fund, which effectively buys you small pieces of ownership in 500 of the largest U.S. companies, is a good place to start.
In terms of the beginning investor, the mutual fund fees are actually an advantage relative to the commissions on stocks. The reason for this is that the fees are the same regardless of the amount you invest. So, as long as you have the minimum requirement to open an account, you can invest as little as $50 or $100 per month in a mutual fund. The term for this is called dollar cost averaging (DCA), and it can be a great way to start investing.
Français: investir en actions boursières, Italiano: Investire in Borsa, Español: invertir en acciones, Português: Investir em Ações, Русский: инвестировать в акции, Deutsch: Geld in Aktien anlegen, 中文: 投资股票, Bahasa Indonesia: Investasi di Saham, Čeština: Jak investovat do akcií, Tiếng Việt: Đầu tư vào Cổ phiếu, 日本語: 株式投資の, العربية: الاستثمار في سوق الأسهم (البورصة), हिन्दी: शेयर बाज़ार (stock market) में निवेश करें, 한국어: 주식 투자하는 방법
"This book provides a good foundation for the beginning investor who is setting out to venture in the stock market. It tells you in plain English about the fundamentals of stock market and investment strategies to deepen your investing literacy. If you're looking for good advice on which stock to buy and when to sell it, you can find it in this book."—Best Ways to Invest Money Blog

The decision between a high-risk, high-return investment strategy and a low-risk, low-return strategy should depend, in part, on your investing time frame. Conventional wisdom states that the farther you are from retirement, the more risk you can afford to take. That means a stock-heavy portfolio in your 20s, when you can afford to chase returns. Then, even if your portfolio takes a hit during a recession when you’re in your 30s, you’ll have time to make up your losses before you retire. By the same logic, the closer you are to retirement, the more you likely want to focus on preserving your gains and avoiding too much risk.
Robo-advisors like Wealthsimple, Wealthfront, and Betterment use algorithms to determine your investment strategy. You just plug in your time frame and risk tolerance and their computers do the rest. And because they’re targeted for a younger crowd, fees are rock bottom. Wealthsimple and Betterment both have no account minimum, while Wealthfront requires $500. Wealthsimple charges an annual 0.5% advising fee; Wealthfront and Betterment charge just 0.25%.
If you’ve never invested in the stock market before, it can be an intimidating process. Stocks are not like savings accounts, money market funds, or certificates of deposit, in that their principal value can both rise and fall. If you don’t have sufficient knowledge of investing — or emotional control — you can lose most or even all of your investment capital.
Most of us don’t have the time to research dozens of individual securities. There are a number of different routes you can take for access and help with investing. The premier choice is typically brokerage firms. These services come with fees, which you should research to find the lowest. There are plenty of brokerages you can join forces with including:
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When you're first starting out, it helps to focus on businesses whose models and products you use or understand. If you're a tech fan, investing in a company that sells gadgets could be a good bet for you. But more than that, you'll want to find companies with a solid competitive advantage. This can come in a number of forms, whether it's an innovative product unlike any other or a fantastically streamlined manufacturing process.
Finally, you need to pay attention to your stocks. You should always stay updated with the stock market and see how things are going. This is why you need a broker if you’re directly investing, as they can do all of this for you. The main reason you need to stay updated is because things could happen that cause your shares to drop and you need to be on the ball and ready to sell to minimize any losses. With steady shares, this isn’t that likely to happen, but it’s still something to be aware of just in case.
The one truth is that in the long term, productivity will go up so over the long term so will the stock market. This graph is on a roughly 100-year scale. It’s easy to understand all zoomed out but when you’re in the thick of it, it’s hard to see where you are in the cycle. Don’t worry, all you need to do is hold on the long-term and you will do just fine.
E*TRADE does require an investment minimum for new brokerage accounts ($500), which may seem like more than a novice would like to throw in. But you’ll need at least that much to see real growth. And compared to the minimums of traditional brokerages, $500 is an incredibly welcoming threshold. And if you can commit to a $10,000 deposit, you can get 60 days of commission-free trades.
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1. Target Date Retirement Fund: A target date retirement fund enables investors to get instant diversification with just one mutual fund. These funds take your contributions and split them among multiple stock and bond mutual funds. In addition, there is no need to rebalance your investments as you age. Target date retirement funds adjust the allocation between stocks and bonds as the investor nears retirement.
A more reliable investment income strategy is to never sell your principle, and instead live off dividend and interest income. A diversified collection of dividend-paying blue chip stocks that have historically grown their dividends even through recessions, combined with some other assets for diversification, can produce more reliable investment income and makes it so you don’t have to touch your principle.

Invest in ETFs. Mutual funds usually aren't an option with just $100. They often require much larger initial investments. Enter ETFs. They combine a variety of securities into one investment. They often don't charge annual maintenance fees. But, you do pay a trading fee when you buy or sell them. We recommend sticking with ETFs that track index funds, such as the S&P 500.

Beyond that, we evaluated each firm on the services that matter most to different types of investors. For example, for active traders, we note providers offering volume discounts on trade commissions and robust mobile trading platforms. For people venturing into investing for the first time, we call out brokers that provide educational support (such as stock-picking tutorials) and on-call chat or phone support.


Don't look at the value of your portfolio more than once a month. If you get caught up in the emotions of Wall Street, it will only tempt you to sell what could be an excellent long-term investment. Before you buy a stock, ask yourself, "if this goes down, am I going to want to sell or am I going to want to buy more of it?" Don't buy it if your answer is the former.
For example, you may hear plenty of positive news on a new technology stock. It is important to stay away until you understand the industry and how it works. The principle of investing in companies you understand was popularized by renowned investor Warren Buffett, who made billions of dollars sticking only with business models he understood and avoiding ones he did not.
Stock market returns have annualized 10% before inflation and 7% after inflation for over 100 years,[39] but can be extremely variable from year to year. From 2000-2015, for example, the compound annual growth rate of the S&P 500 was 4.2%. Don't count on 10% return, if you are investing for a short time frame, or if you are also invested in bonds and alternative investments, which have lower expected returns. Furthermore, remember that past performance does not guarantee future returns.

Invest in ETFs. Mutual funds usually aren't an option with just $100. They often require much larger initial investments. Enter ETFs. They combine a variety of securities into one investment. They often don't charge annual maintenance fees. But, you do pay a trading fee when you buy or sell them. We recommend sticking with ETFs that track index funds, such as the S&P 500.


Andrew:                              00:50                     Yeah, I love it. So maybe I’m recording this because this is something I need to tell myself more than anything else. Having people around and having them influence your life can do a lot of things for you. Very, very well. They say the five people closest to you are the most important because they impact how you live your life and the big, big way. So I, I kind of present this topic and this idea based on some personal context. I guess I didn’t mean to get like super personal, but there’s a saying that as you get close to the turn of a decade you start to make big moves, right? So we’re here close to the end of 2020 and that full decade before.
Commission prices are the key advantage of online discount brokers. Consider that a popular full-service brokerage firm charges a minimum of $50 just to buy or sell stock. The commission is variable, so the larger the order, the larger the commission. To buy or sell $10,000 of stock, a client would pay $80. On a $25,000 order, the commission surges to $205! Commissions for funds can be even higher!

While you are accumulating money for investments and piling them into mutual funds and ETF’s, you should use this time to educate yourself about the game of investing. Read books, listen to CDs, read The Wall Street Journal, take a course or two at a brokerage firm or even a community college, join investment forums, and regularly visit investment websites, like InvestorJunkie.com.
And if you’re interested in learning how to invest, but you need a little help getting up to speed, robo-advisors can help there, too. It’s useful to see how the service constructs a portfolio and what investments are used. Some services also offer educational content and tools, and a few even allow you to customize your portfolio to a degree if you wish to experiment a bit in the future.
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