Meaning is something we’ve touched on already, but it’s also something that many investors sadly overlook. If a company has meaning to you – if you are inspired by and interested in what they do – you are going to be more likely to understand that company, more motivated to research them, and thus more likely to make wise decisions about when they should be bought and sold.
But since there is virtually no risk, there isn't much interest. The interest is comparable to higher savings accounts (many of the highest-yielding 1-year CDs currently pay a little over 2 percent). There are even some banks that offer no-penalty CDs, meaning if you need to withdraw the money early, you won't get hit with a fee. Still, if you're worried that you might need your money, you may be better off finding a savings account that offers as much interest as possible – since you will be able to withdraw your money without a fee.

Mutual funds. Mutual funds are similar to ETFs; they're both bundles of stocks with subtle differences. For instance, ETFs trade throughout the trading day and mutual funds trade at the end of the day at the net asset value price. The main differentiator: ETFs generally have lower management fees and commissions than mutual funds. Mutual funds (and some ETFs) also often require at least $1,000 to get started and many have a higher minimum. However, some mutual funds can be found for $1,000 or less, like T. Rowe Price and Vanguard.
There’s good news: You largely can, thanks to robo-advisors. These services manage your investments for you using computer algorithms. Due to low overhead, they charge low fees relative to human investment managers — a robo-advisor typically costs 0.25% to 0.50% of your account balance per year, and many allow you to open an account with no minimum.
Since stocks are highly volatile but have the most return potential, they are more appropriate for younger investors. In contrast, bonds are designed for predictability, making them better for older investors with lower risk tolerance. Cash investments are typically not a good idea unless you have lots of near-term liquidity needs. Determining the appropriate asset allocation for your investment strategy is a critical step to take.
In terms of diversification, the greatest amount of difficulty in doing this will come from investments in stocks. This was illustrated in the commissions section of the article, where we discussed how the costs of investing in a large number of stocks can be detrimental to the portfolio. With a $1,000 deposit, it is nearly impossible to have a well-diversified portfolio, so be aware that you may need to invest in one or two companies (at the most) to begin with. This will increase your risk. The World's Worst Stock Investment Advice
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