In picking those individual stocks, there are many different yet equally promising strategies you can follow. Some investors concentrate on dividend-paying stocks to provide them with relative safety and security from their stock portfolio, along with regular income that they can use either to cover cash needs or to reinvest into buying additional shares of stock. Value investing involves finding underappreciated stocks whose prices are at a discount to the true intrinsic value of the underlying business, and well-known investors like Warren Buffett have used value-investing tenets to produce strong returns.
We want to hear from you and encourage a lively discussion among our users. Please help us keep our site clean and safe by following our posting guidelines, and avoid disclosing personal or sensitive information such as bank account or phone numbers. Any comments posted under NerdWallet's official account are not reviewed or endorsed by representatives of financial institutions affiliated with the reviewed products, unless explicitly stated otherwise.

Meanwhile, other passive investors may decide mutual funds are optimal. Mutual funds pool money from investors and use that money to buy holdings for its portfolio. As an investor, you own shares in the mutual fund. The fund's portfolio managers take care of all the investment decisions. For that privilege, the fund company charges an annual management fee to fund shareholders.
Knowing how to secure your financial well-being is one of the most important things you’ll ever need in life. You don’t have to be a genius to do it. You just need to know a few basics, form a plan, and be ready to stick to it. There is no guarantee that you’ll make money from investments you make. But if you get the facts about saving and investing and follow through with an intelligent plan, you should be able to gain financial security over the years and enjoy the benefits of managing your money. For more information, SEC’s publication Saving and Investing: A Roadmap To Your Financial Security Through Saving and Investing.
Knowing where you can put your money is a huge step, but you also need to figure out exactly how much to put there. If you don’t have a detailed budget, at least make a list of all your expenses: what you spend monthly on bills, loan payments, food and entertainment. Only invest once you know you can pay your monthly bills and you’ve saved at least three months’ worth of living expenses in an emergency fund.
When you open an investment account, you can put your money into any number of vehicles: Investing in mutual funds, exchange-traded funds and bonds are all options. A typical investment portfolio includes a mix of volatile and more predictable options, which enables your portfolio to weather the lows of the market while capitalizing on its highs. Review these types of investments and see if any fit your needs.
You'll also want to look at a stock's P/E ratio, or price to earnings ratio, which is its market capitalization (the total value of its outstanding shares) divided by its earnings over the past year. Generally speaking, a high P/E ratio tells you that investors are placing a higher value on the company, which often means that company's stock will be more expensive than a company with a lower P/E ratio. But this doesn't always hold true. 
Brokers are either full-service or "discount." Full-service brokers, as the name implies, give the full range of traditional brokerage services, including financial advice for retirement, healthcare and everything related to money. They usually only deal with higher net-worth clients, and they can charge substantial fees, including a percent of your transactions, a percent of your assets they manage and a yearly membership fee. It's common to see minimum account sizes of $25,000 and up at full-service brokerages.

Traditionally, Americans have tended to stay close to home when it comes to their equity portfolios, but this is now changing as more investors realize the diversification and growth benefits of investing in the global economy. Indeed, U.S. companies constitute only about half the value of all world equities, and that piece of the pie is slowing getting smaller. Virtually every portfolio should have a good slug of international stocks.
Phil is a hedge fund manager and author of 3 New York Times best-selling investment books, Invested, Rule #1, and Payback Time. He was taught how to invest using Rule #1 strategy when he was a Grand Canyon river guide in the 80's, after a tour group member shared his formula for successful investing. Phil has a passion educating others, and has given thousands of people the confidence to start investing and retire comfortably.
Other industries perform well in poor or falling economies. These industries and companies are usually not as affected by the economy. For example, utilities and insurance companies are usually less affected by consumer confidence, because people still have to pay for electricity and health insurance. These industries and companies are known as “defensive” or “counter-cyclical.” [21]
When it comes to investing in stocks, you can either buy and sell shares yourself (self-directed investing) or you can use an advisor and have your money managed for you (managed investing). Way back when (early 1900s), you had to use a licensed professional known as a stock broker to place stock trades on your behalf. Thanks to the Internet, investors around the globe now invest for themselves using an online brokerage account. Today, "stock broker" is just another name for an online brokerage account.

Investing is defined as “the outlay of money usually for income or profit.” The idea behind investing? Put your money to work for you in something you believe will increase in value over time. Investing your money in the stock market may seem like a foreign concept; how do you know which funds to invest in? How does trading actually work? And what the heck is a mutual fund?


Which brokerage offers the best educational videos? TD Ameritrade, hands down. TD Ameritrade's educational video library is made entirely in-house and provides hundreds of videos covering every investment topic imaginable, from stocks to ETFs, mutual funds, options, bonds, and even retirement. Progress tracking is also part of the learning experience.
Based on 1,820 data points, our top pick for beginners is TD Ameritrade. New investors have access to a user-friendly website, hundreds of monthly webinars, videos, and free premium courses and quizzes. TD Ameritrade is the only broker to gamify the entire learning experience, offering customers a points system tied to progress tracking, and even badges to encourage continued learning. Oh, and customers can practice trading with fake money. Read full review
Always compare a company to its peers. For example, assume you want to buy Company X. You can look at Company X's projected earnings growth, profit margins, and price-to-earnings ratio. You would then compare these figures to those of Company X's closest competitors. If Company X has better profit margins, better projected earnings, and a lower price-to-earnings ratio, it may be a better buy.
Roth IRA. "My first and strongly encouraged piece of advice to the new investor would be to open a Roth IRA," McKaig says. "Roth IRAs offer new investors several benefits, chief among them the ability to receive tax-free income later in life," he adds. "The government does not tax either the contributions or the earnings growth when the funds are withdrawn in retirement. That can result in a pretty significant nest egg after decades of compounding growth."
You can set up an account by depositing cash or stocks in a brokerage account. Firms like Charles Schwab and Citigroup’s Smith Barney unit offer brokerage accounts that can be managed online or with a broker in person. If you prefer buying and selling stocks online, you can use sites like E-Trade or Ameritrade. Those are just two of the most well-known electronic brokerages, but many large firms have online options as well.
An important tip for investing for beginners with little money is to always keep an eye on costs! There can be costs associated when you buy or sell as well as annual costs from mutual funds or ETFs (Electronic Traded Funds). You will want to look at the expense ratio charged, which are the annual fees funds’ and ETFs charge. The lower the better! Also, only purchase mutual funds that do not have a purchase fee (load fee) when you buy a fund. Lastly, remember that some of the brokerage companies offer their own ETFs at very low or at transaction free costs. Check out Betterment or Future Advisor.
An important thing to note is that you aren’t going to learn investing overnight. Learning how to invest in the stock market is a skill you’ll acquire with patience and some guidance. Becoming a successful investor, and learning how to identify investments with high returns, is a process. It will take some time to understand all of the ins and outs of financial investing 101, but by reading this guide, you’ll be on your way.

The solution to both is investing in stock index funds and ETFs. While mutual funds might require a $1,000 minimum or more, index fund minimums tend to be lower (and ETFs are purchased for a share price that could be lower still). Two brokers, Fidelity and Charles Schwab, offer index funds with no minimum at all. Index funds also cure the diversification issue because they hold many different stocks within a single fund.


Investing when you’re young is one of the best ways to see solid returns on your money. You probably can’t count on Social Security to provide enough income for a comfortable retirement, so having your own long-term savings will be crucial. Even for shorter-term financial goals (like buying a home), investments that earn higher returns than a traditional savings account could be useful.

We recently explained in detail how to set up a brokerage account, but to recap: A brokerage account is a bit like a savings account — you can move money in and out freely — except you use the money to buy stocks or other investments, and those investments aren’t FDIC insured. Some of the most popular online stock brokers — which allow you to trade stocks at a discount compared to traditional brokerage houses — include Scottrade, E*TRADE, and Charles Schwab.
Bankrate.com is an independent, advertising-supported publisher and comparison service. Bankrate is compensated in exchange for featured placement of sponsored products and services, or your clicking on links posted on this website. This compensation may impact how, where and in what order products appear. Bankrate.com does not include all companies or all available products. E2: The 1st Round NBA Playoffs Episode
×