Stock investing is filled with intricate strategies and approaches, yet some of the most successful investors have done little more than stick with the basics. That generally means using funds for the bulk of your portfolio — Warren Buffett has famously said a low-cost S&P 500 index fund is the best investment most Americans can make — and choosing individual stocks only if you believe in the company’s potential for long-term growth.
Technically, you are only limited by the minimum amount required by a brokerage firm or mutual fund company to open an account. ShareBuilder, an online broker, has no required minimum account balance. More than 50 mutual funds included in our annual mutual fund guide have minimum purchase requirements of $100 or less, including funds offered by Fidelity, AssetMark, USAA and Oakmark.

Some people think that home values are guaranteed to go up. History has shown otherwise: real estate values in most areas show very modest rates of return after accounting for costs such as maintenance, taxes and insurance. As with many investments, real estate values do invariably rise if given enough time. If your time horizon is short, however, property ownership is not a guaranteed money-maker. [6]
Billionaire investor and CEO of Berkshire Hathaway, Warren Buffett, wanted to enable everyday investors to get in on his stock while not splitting the existing stock (making one existing share worth two or three shares, etc.). While splitting stock can attract new investors, it can also encourage speculative investment from those looking to make a quick profit by buying into the new, cheaper stock and getting out a short time later after making a quick profit when the stock goes up. If enough people were to sell too quickly, it could seriously devalue the stock.
Let’s say you’re interested in investing in Nike. If you look that up, the stock symbol is NKE on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE). The first number you’ll probably notice on any financial news site with a stock tracker is the current share price. In the United States, this is measured in dollars and cents, but the units may vary depending on where in the world you’re investing. In London, for example, they measure stock prices in pence.

Like many new investors, you've decided to invest in a company and pick up your first shares of stock, but your limited knowledge leaves you wondering how to do it. Don't worry! This overview was designed to help you learn precisely that - how to invest in stocks. To be more specific, for you new investors, this page was put together to serve as an introductory depository of investment articles designed to get many of the basics out of the way before moving on to some of the more advanced topics which I've written over the past years.
You can also buy or trade stocks yourself, but you must go through a licensed broker. This can be as simple as an online interface where you are on your own, or as complex as hiring a fee-based money manager who handles all aspects of your finances. In-between, there are discount brokers offering minimal advice for slightly higher fees and full-service brokers that take the time to meet with you and understand your goals and needs. 

A "record date" is the date a dividend distribution is declared, the date at the close of which one must be the shareholder in order to receive the declared dividend. An "ex-dividend date" is typically two business days before the record date. When shares of a stock are sold near the record date of a dividend declaration, the ex-dividend date is the last day on which the seller is clearly entitled to the dividend payment.
If you want more help with your investing, there is a variety of ways to find financial advice: if you want someone who helps you in a non-sales environment, you can find an advisor in your area at one of the following sites: letsmakeaplan.org, www.napfa.org, and garrettplanningnetwork.com. You can also go to your local bank or financial institution. Many of these charge higher fees, however, and may require a large opening investment.
The third priority for most people is to max out a 401(k) or TSP. Not taking advantage of this tax advantage means leaving money on the table. There could be some exceptions, like if you are planning to retire super-early, or if your employer’s 401(k) plan is really bad, or if you’re strongly interested in real estate investing and want to elevate that on the list of priorities.
Let's start with this basic truth: At its core, investing is about laying out money today with the expectation of getting more money back in the future — which, accounting for time, adjusting for risk, and factoring in inflation, results in a satisfactory compound annual growth rate, particularly as compared to standards considered a "good" investment.
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With this information in hand, you're ready to place your trade. Enter the stock symbol for the company you want to buy (or sell). Pick an action (buy or sell). Enter the number of shares you want to buy or sell, and confirm whether you're willing to pay whatever the current price is for that stock (that's a market order), or whether you're willing to wait and hope the stock reaches a specified price (a limit order).
Based on 1,820 data points, our top pick for beginners is TD Ameritrade. New investors have access to a user-friendly website, hundreds of monthly webinars, videos, and free premium courses and quizzes. TD Ameritrade is the only broker to gamify the entire learning experience, offering customers a points system tied to progress tracking, and even badges to encourage continued learning. Oh, and customers can practice trading with fake money. Read full review
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Some retirement plans and accounts also have asset protection benefits. For instance, some have unlimited bankruptcy protection, meaning that if you suffer a medical disaster or some other event that wipes out your personal balance sheet and forces you to declare bankruptcy, your retirement savings will be out of the reach of creditors. Others have limitations on the asset protection afforded to them, but still reach into the seven-figures.
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If your savings goal is more than 20 years away (like retirement), almost all of your money can be in stocks, Waldman says. The stock market can be unpredictable, with huge ups and downs depending on how well the economy is doing, but you’re likely to make more money there than with less risky assets (like bonds, or keeping cash in a savings account). Over nearly the last century, the stock market’s average return is about 10% annually.

With that in mind, there are certain types of stocks that make excellent long-term investments, especially for beginners. There are many things to look for in your first stock investments, but just to name a few: You'll want to learn basic ways to value stocks, identify durable competitive advantages, and understand how a business makes money. Of course, our writers at The Motley Fool regularly suggest some good beginner stocks, like these examples.


If you have the option to do so, gaining full employer matching from a 401(k) or Thrift Savings Plan is the highest priority, because it’s essentially a 100% return on your investment up front, assuming they give you the typical 5% matching if you contribute 5% of your salary. Also, it’s tax-advantaged and automatic; it comes out of your paycheck before you get your hands on it, which is a strategy called “paying yourself first”.
Notice: Information contained herein is not and should not be construed as an offer, solicitation, or recommendation to buy or sell securities. The information has been obtained from sources we believe to be reliable; however no guarantee is made or implied with respect to its accuracy, timeliness, or completeness. Authors may own the stocks they discuss. The information and content are subject to change without notice.
E*TRADE does require an investment minimum for new brokerage accounts ($500), which may seem like more than a novice would like to throw in. But you’ll need at least that much to see real growth. And compared to the minimums of traditional brokerages, $500 is an incredibly welcoming threshold. And if you can commit to a $10,000 deposit, you can get 60 days of commission-free trades.
By far and away the biggest question every beginner wants to know the answer to is what stocks are best for investing in? If you’re hoping this is where you find a list of stocks to invest in, then you’re about to be let down! There is no magic list of what stocks to invest in. (And be wary of advice from anyone who says otherwise!) Instead, there are a few things you can look for in stocks and shares that make them worth your money.
Investing for beginners starts with figuring out your financial goals – do you want short-term cash for something like a car, or do you want to invest your money long-term for something like a college fund? Your timeline will help you determine which financial vehicles you should consider, whether it is in the form of something like stocks, mutual funds or money market account. You should also decide whether you want to work with a professional broker or financial adviser who can help you create your financial portfolio. As with any financial decision, what you do with your money is ultimately up to you, so investing for beginners is something that you’ll be able to customize to best suit your financial goals.

These funds could own a mixture of government bonds, high-rated corporate bonds, and foreign bonds. The most significant difference between holding an individual bond and a bond ETF is when you are paid interest. Bonds only make interest payments every six months. But bond ETFs make payments every month, as all the bonds the fund owns may pay interest at different times of the year.
Now that you know how to buy and research stocks, the question is: Why should you risk your money? After all, aren't bonds a much safer prospect? A bond is a debt instrument wherein you lend the issuer a certain amount of money in exchange for interest payments at a predefined rate and a return of your principal once the bond comes due. Though bond prices can fluctuate based on market conditions, as long as you hold your bonds until maturity and the issuer doesn't default, you get to collect the interest you're entitled to as well as get your full principal back. 
While a limit order guarantees the price you’ll get if the order is executed, there’s no guarantee that the order will be filled fully, partially or even at all. Limit orders are placed on a first-come, first-served basis, and only after market orders are filled, and only if the stock stays within your set parameters long enough for the broker to execute the trade.
Sell for a profit. Flipping isn't just for houses. You can flip products too. If you have a seasoned eye for hot items at estate sales or on Craigslist, go for it. Take your $100 and buy those items. Turn around and sell them for a profit and you have an instant return. This is a great side hustle gig as it doesn't take a lot of time and has very little overhead. You can do this in your free time, while still making your full-time income.
NerdWallet's ratings for brokers and robo-advisors are weighted averages of several categories, including investment selection, customer support, account fees, account minimum, trading costs and more. Our survey of brokers and robo-advisors includes the largest U.S. providers by assets under management, plus notable and/or emerging players in the industry. Factors we consider, depending on the category, include advisory fees, branch access, user-facing technology, customer service and mobile features. The stars represent ratings from poor (one star) to excellent (five stars). Ratings are rounded to the nearest half-star.

We believe that it is axiomatic that while capital flows will drive market values in the short term, valuations will drive market values over the long term. As a result, large and growing inflows to index funds, coupled with their market-cap driven allocation policies, drive index component valuations upwards and reduce their potential long-term rates of return. As the most popular index funds’ constituent companies become overvalued, these funds long-term rates of returns will likely decline, reducing investor appeal and increasing capital outflows. When capital flows reverse, index fund returns will likely decline, reducing investor interest, further increasing capital outflows, and so on. While we would not yet describe the current phenomenon as an index fund bubble, it shares similar characteristics with other market bubbles.
The "miracle" of compound interest: earning interest on previously earned interest is what Albert Einstein called "the eighth wonder of the world." Compounding is guaranteed to make your retirement years easier if you let it work its magic by leaving your money invested and untouched for as long as possible. Many years of compounding can bring astonishingly good results.
When you open an investment account, you can put your money into any number of vehicles: Investing in mutual funds, exchange-traded funds and bonds are all options. A typical investment portfolio includes a mix of volatile and more predictable options, which enables your portfolio to weather the lows of the market while capitalizing on its highs. Review these types of investments and see if any fit your needs.
Buy individual stocks. $100 might not buy you a lot of stocks, but investing in one right stock may make you money. Using a discount broker, such as Ally, can help keep your trading fees down. Ally offers research tools to help you choose the right stock. Investing in individual stocks rather than ETFs can help you do better than the market average. You can start investing with no minimum deposit on Ally Invest.
Schwab Trading Services™ includes access to StreetSmart® trading platforms, the Schwab Trading Community, and Schwab trading specialists (a Schwab brokerage account is required). There are no fees to use Schwab Trading Services. Other account fees, optional data fees, fund expenses, and brokerage commissions may apply. Schwab reserves the right to restrict or modify access at any time. Schwab brokerage account online applications that have the “Schwab Trading Services” box checked will automatically be enrolled. For questions, call 888-245-6864 to speak to a Schwab Trading Services representative.
Actually, scratch that. Here's a better question: What company do you love? Are you a devoted buyer of Chevrolet trucks? If so, then maybe General Motors (NYSE:GM) is the stock for you. Were you first in line when Guardians of the Galaxy 2, Rogue One, or Beauty and the Beast opened at the cineplex? Then maybe you should take a look at Disney (NYSE:DIS) stock. Disney owns the Marvel, the Star Wars, and, of course, the Disney movie franchises.
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Congratulations! By making it to this article you've taken an important first step in your investing journey -- picking a broker. There are many stock brokers to choose from, and each offers something a little bit different. See our article below for more info on what you should be looking for, along with a list of our top online stock broker picks for beginners.
Option trading entails a high level of risk and is not suitable for all investors. Certain requirements must be met to be approved for option trading. Those trading options (both Buyers and Sellers) should be familiar with the theory, strategy, pricing of options and related risk factors. Please read the Characteristics and Risks of Standardized Options before trading options.

One type of broker isn’t necessarily better for everyone. In fact, many people use both types of services over their lifetime. A saver who is just starting out might have more reason to use a discount broker, so as to save money while accumulating assets for retirement. Given a full-service broker might charge you as much as $500 in fees to invest $10,000 in a fund, whereas a discount broker might charge as little as $5, the cost difference alone is reason enough for new investors to use a discount brokerage firm.

Thinkorswim, on the other hand, is a powerhouse designed for the advanced. This desktop application regularly racks up awards for its superior tools and features — research reports, real-time data, charts, technical studies. Things any other broker would charge a premium for. Also included: customizable workspaces, extensive third-party research, and a thriving trader chat room. There’s also a fully functional mobile app.

If you’re on a tight budget, try to invest just one percent of your salary into the retirement plan available to you at work. The truth is, you probably won’t even miss a contribution that small. You'll also get a tax deduction, which will make the contribution even less painful. Once you're comfortable with a one percent contribution, maybe you can increase it as you get annual raises. You won't likely miss the additional contributions

Finally, the other factor: risk tolerance. The stock market goes up and down, and if you’re prone to panicking when it does the latter, you’re better off investing slightly more conservatively, with a lighter allocation to stocks. Not sure? We have a risk tolerance quiz — and more information about how to make this decision — in our article about what to invest in.
If you're going to invest in stocks, you have a couple of choices. The easier method is to buy a mutual fund or exchange-traded fund that owns all of the stocks in a popular index like the Dow Jones Industrials or S&P 500. By doing so, you're essentially buying the whole universe of stocks within the index you choose, participating in the general growth of the entire market.
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That means you can start with as little as 1% of each paycheck, though it’s a good idea to aim for contributing at least as much as your employer match. For example, a common matching arrangement is 50% of the first 6% of your salary you contribute. To capture the full match in that scenario, you would have to contribute 6% of your salary each year. But you can work your way up to that over time.
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