The first and often easiest method of buying stock without a broker is in situations where companies, often blue chips, sponsor a special type of program called a DSPP, or Direct Stock Purchase Plan. These plans were originally conceived generations ago as a way for businesses to let smaller investors buy ownership directly from the company, working through a transfer agent or plan administrator responsible for dealing with the day-to-day paperwork and transactions. Most plans will allow investors to buy stock without a broker if they agree to either have a reasonable amount taken out of their checking or savings account every month for six months (often $50 is the acceptable minimum) or they make a one-time purchase, often $250 or $500.

So you have a $1,000 set aside, and you're ready to enter the world of stock investing. But before you jump head first into the world of stocks and bonds, there are a few things you need to consider. One of the biggest considerations for investors with a minimal amount of funds is not only what to invest in but also how to go about investing. Not long into your investment journey you may find yourself bombarded with minimum deposit restrictions, commissions and the need for diversification, among a myriad of other considerations. In this article, we'll walk you through getting started as an investor and show you how to maximize your returns by minimizing your costs.
Put simply: Buying stocks online is easy, and yet it’s incredibly complicated to do it well. It’s almost always the best idea to let a professional handle it. With the current level of technology, you don’t need to even pick a professional — you can pick a program that a professional designed. That’s going to help you to grow a significant retirement nest egg, provided that you can leave the money sitting in your account long enough.
There are many fees an investor will incur when investing in mutual funds. One of the most important fees to focus on is the management expense ratio (MER), which is charged by the management team each year, based on the amount of assets in the fund. The MER ranges from 0.05 percent to 0.7 percent annually and varies depending on the type of fund. But the higher the MER, the worse it is for the fund's investors. Happy Independence Day
Put broadly, investing is the creation of more money through the use of capital. Essentially, when you invest, you offer your money to people and organizations who have an immediate use for it, and in exchange, they give you a share of the money that they earn with this funding. There are different types of investments — including stocks, bonds and real estate — and each comes with its own level of risk.
Investing is the one place where a “head in the sand” strategy might be the smartest method. Set up auto deposits into your investment accounts each month and only look at your portfolio once every three to six months. This reduces the likelihood of panic selling when the market falls or piling in more money when everything seems like rainbows and butterflies.
As a financial advisor, I recommend this book to anyone wanting to learn the Wall Street stock market game and build wealth. The book explains in plain English how to calculate rates of returns,determine your risk level and the rule of 72, which will help you reach your financial goals. One of the best chapter is on the fundamentals of the stock market. It explains the various exchanges, how to value a stock and a list of the typical questions and answers a novice investor would ask.
If you’re looking at a decent source, you should be able to get an idea of the performance of the company over the past day all the way back to the past 10 years if the company has been on the exchange for a while. You’ll also be able to tell how active the stock is for a given period based on how often it gets traded. You figure this out by looking at the volume number.
Andrew:                              01:35                     We should slap this person on the wrist. I’m cautiously putting it in a mere $600 into a variety of stocks. I was wondering if you could cover how a company’s stock gets affected if they get acquired by a larger company. Is it a good time to buy when that happens? Is it the worst time to buy? So something that you know we can cover and then we’ll try to keep it short because these things can be very, very complicated. But it’s important to know just as a generality what goes on in an acquisition if you’re the company being acquired and also what happens in spinoffs so you can kind of lump them all together because they are these special situations that you’ll see with stocks for a company being acquired. Let’s say you’re a shareholder. And you know, I believe when I did the back to the basics series episodes ago, right?
You can think of investing in bonds as lending money to the government or a corporation, and in exchange, they pay you interest. Treasury bonds are very “safe” in that they are backed-up by the U.S. government. They also pay very little to hold them. Corporate bonds pay more interest, but they are more risky because just like stocks, the company could go bankrupt.
Common stock represents an ownership share in a given company. When you buy shares of common stock, you get voting rights with regard to that company. For example, if a new board of directors is proposed, you'd get a say in whether or not it's elected. And that's important, because the board will make decisions about the company's future, such as whether to expand operations, shut down certain revenue streams, or acquire other businesses, all of which can affect your stock price. As a holder of common stock, you're also entitled to dividends, provided the companies you've invested in are paying them. Assuming you hold shares of a company that is paying, you'll receive a certain amount of money for each share you own.
If you’re considering getting started investing in collectibles, make sure you do a lot of homework and get educated first. This is also an area where there are a lot of investing scams. It’s also important to remember that collectible investment gains are taxed at a much higher rate that other investments – which is your ordinary income tax rate (not the special 20% for capital gains).

If you were to sell these five stocks, you would once again incur the costs of the trades, which would be another $50. To make the round trip (buying and selling) on these five stocks would cost you $100, or 10 percent of your initial deposit amount of $1,000. If your investments don't earn enough to cover this, you have lost money by just entering and exiting positions.


Some companies offer direct stock purchase plans (DSPPs) that allow you to purchase their stock without a broker. If you are planning on buying and holding or dollar cost averaging, this may be your best option. Search online or call or write the company whose stock you wish to buy to inquire whether they offer such a plan. [35] Pay attention to the fee schedule and select the plans that charge no or minimal fees.

ETFs, on the other hand, trade like stocks, making them easy to add to your investment portfolio. There are no minimums for these securities, though their strategies vary equally. Many ETFs follow well known indexes from the S&P 500 or the Dow Jones Industrial Average. Others track collections of stocks that concentrate on industries like healthcare, technology or materials.
"Here's the trap for the new person," Seiden says. "They will focus on the stocks where the news is good, but by the time they get the news, everyone else [in the know] has already bought it." This cycle means new investors are often buying when prices are highest. A better route is to watch a stock price and buy when it's down, a tactic Seiden encourages as a way to buy shares at a sale price.

The 10/10 rule expects a 10% CAGR (compound annual growth rate) dividend growth to pass the test. To achieve consistent dividend growth with a 10% CAGR growth, a company must be able to grow the earnings, otherwise, the payout ratio will get out of hands. If the dividend payout ratio becomes an issue, investors will start assuming the dividend is at risk. Investors will sell, the price will go down, the dividend yield will go up and either the dividend is reduced or there is earnings growth.


For example, you may hear plenty of positive news on a new technology stock. It is important to stay away until you understand the industry and how it works. The principle of investing in companies you understand was popularized by renowned investor Warren Buffett, who made billions of dollars sticking only with business models he understood and avoiding ones he did not.
With the right approach, stocks are an appropriate investment for people of almost all ages. Generally speaking, the younger you are, the more of your money you should put into stocks, since you have time to ride out the market's ups and downs. As you get older, it's usually a good idea to shift some investments out of stocks and into safer vehicles, like bonds. But even if you're retired or close to retirement, stocks still have a place in your portfolio.
Do not day-trade, swing-trade, or otherwise trade stocks for very short-term profits. Remember, the more frequently you trade, the more commissions you incur, which will reduce any gains you make. Also, short-term gains are taxed more heavily than long-term (more than one-year) gains. The best reason to avoid ultra-short-term trades is that success in that area requires a great deal of skill, knowledge and nerve, to say nothing of luck. It is not for the inexperienced.
Investing when you’re young is one of the best ways to see solid returns on your money. You probably can’t count on Social Security to provide enough income for a comfortable retirement, so having your own long-term savings will be crucial. Even for shorter-term financial goals (like buying a home), investments that earn higher returns than a traditional savings account could be useful.
Sell for a profit. Flipping isn't just for houses. You can flip products too. If you have a seasoned eye for hot items at estate sales or on Craigslist, go for it. Take your $100 and buy those items. Turn around and sell them for a profit and you have an instant return. This is a great side hustle gig as it doesn't take a lot of time and has very little overhead. You can do this in your free time, while still making your full-time income.
What makes this risk management tool so great is that it focuses almost exclusively on the financials of the business, rather than how Wall Street perceives it through price action. This is in contrast to other risk management tools such as trailing stops or momentum indicators, which could be based more on emotion rather than business financial reality.  
Phil Town is an investment advisor, hedge fund manager, 3x NY Times best-selling author, ex-Grand Canyon river guide and a former Lieutenant in the US Army Special Forces. He and his wife, Melissa, share a passion for horses, polo, and eventing. Phil’s goal is to help you learn how to invest and achieve financial independence. You can follow him on google+, facebook, and twitter.
All pricing data was obtained from a published web site as of 02/18/2019 and is believed to be accurate, but is not guaranteed. The StockBrokers.com staff is constantly working with its online broker representatives to obtain the latest pricing data. If you believe any data listed above is inaccurate, please contact us using the link at the bottom of this page. For stock trade rates, advertised pricing is for a standard order size of 500 shares of stock priced at $30 per share. For options orders, an options regulatory fee per contract may apply.
Buying stock is like purchasing a little slice of a company. Say you buy stock in consumer goods company P&G (manufacturer of Tide, Crest, Dawn, Tampax and many other household names); that stock costs $90.98 per share at the time of this writing. If you buy that share, you are betting that P&G will continue to grow and make money. P&G uses your $90.98 to invest in its business; open new locations, fund new products, hire new staff, etc.
We recently explained in detail how to set up a brokerage account, but to recap: A brokerage account is a bit like a savings account — you can move money in and out freely — except you use the money to buy stocks or other investments, and those investments aren’t FDIC insured. Some of the most popular online stock brokers — which allow you to trade stocks at a discount compared to traditional brokerage houses — include Scottrade, E*TRADE, and Charles Schwab.

While you are accumulating money for investments and piling them into mutual funds and ETF’s, you should use this time to educate yourself about the game of investing. Read books, listen to CDs, read The Wall Street Journal, take a course or two at a brokerage firm or even a community college, join investment forums, and regularly visit investment websites, like InvestorJunkie.com.

Other key clues to look out for are how long the management team has been serving the company. Longevity is often a good sign that the folks in charge are doing something right. You'll also want a management team that's innovative and willing to take risks, but not too many risks. By reading up on a company and its history, you can get a sense of the sort of decisions its management team has made, and how those decisions have panned out.
A "record date" is the date a dividend distribution is declared, the date at the close of which one must be the shareholder in order to receive the declared dividend. An "ex-dividend date" is typically two business days before the record date. When shares of a stock are sold near the record date of a dividend declaration, the ex-dividend date is the last day on which the seller is clearly entitled to the dividend payment.
Interest rates on bonds normally reflect the prevailing market interest rate. Say you buy a bond with an interest rate of 3%. If interest rates on other investments then go up to 4% and you're stuck with a bond paying 3%, not many people would be willing to buy your bond from you when they can buy another bond that pays them 4% interest. For this reason, you would have to lower the price of your bond in order to sell it. The opposite situation applies when bond market rates are falling.

Picking specific stocks can be complicated, so consider investing in an index fund, which mirrors the performance of an entire stock market index. An index fund is a good option for new investors because it provides diversification, or a way to reduce investing risk by owning a range of assets across a variety of industries, company sizes and geographic areas. Research has shown that index funds, which are “passively managed” funds, perform better than actively managed funds, which have a fund manager choosing specific stocks and bonds in an attempt to outperform the market.


By creating a budget, you can determine how much money you have to invest. You can assign portions of your income to various savings goals, ranging from shorter-term ones, like buying a house, to longer-term ones, like retirement. Before you allocate money to your investment goals, however, many financial experts recommend putting aside money for an emergency fund.
What are ETFs? ETFs trade on the stock exchange, just like regular stocks. However, they are comprised of more than one stock, bond, futures, or foreign asset. They allow you to trade an entire market, such as the S&P 500 with one single fund. You can trade them as often as you want throughout the day. This is unlike mutual funds, which only trade once the market has closed for the day.

When you first begin investing you’ll be far better off with mutual funds and ETFs than plunging right into stocks. Funds are professionally managed, and this will remove the burden of stock selection from your plate. All you need to do is determine how much money you want to put into a given fund, or group of funds, and then you’re free to get on with the rest of your life.


Full-service brokers are what most people visualize when they think about investing—well-dressed, friendly business people sitting in an office chatting with clients. These are the traditional stockbrokers who will take the time to get to know you personally and financially. They will look at factors such as marital status, lifestyle, personality, risk tolerance, age (time horizon), income, assets, debts, and more. By getting to know as much about you as they can, these full-service brokers can then help you develop a long-term financial plan.
One type of broker isn’t necessarily better for everyone. In fact, many people use both types of services over their lifetime. A saver who is just starting out might have more reason to use a discount broker, so as to save money while accumulating assets for retirement. Given a full-service broker might charge you as much as $500 in fees to invest $10,000 in a fund, whereas a discount broker might charge as little as $5, the cost difference alone is reason enough for new investors to use a discount brokerage firm.
Dave:                                    00:35                     All right folks, we’ll welcome to the Investing for Beginners podcast. This will be our podcast episode 100 Ooh; we made it. That’s awesome. All right, so today we’re going to talk about the basics of spinoffs and acquisitions, and we’re going to, we’ve talked a lot about these from the aspect of the company buying, but today we’re going to kind of go over some generalities of the other side. So the company that’s being acquired or spun off. So Andrew, why don’t you go ahead and take us off. I know we have a listener question regarding this as well as some are our general thoughts on this.
Crowdfunded real estate allows you to join other investors to pool your money to invest in a property – very similar to peer to peer lending. The great thing about this is that there are low minimums – depending on the platform you use, you can invest as little as $1,000 and be an owner in a property. Also, you don’t have to be an accredited investor to get started – anyone can do it.
Learn a little bit about stocks. This is what most people think of when they consider "investing." Put simply, a stock is a share in the ownership of a business, a publicly-held company. The stock itself is a claim on what the company owns — its assets and earnings. [1] When you buy stock in a company, you are making yourself part-owner. If the company does well, the value of the stock will probably go up, and the company may pay you a "dividend," a reward for your investment. If the company does poorly, however, the stock will probably lose value.
Because index funds take a passive approach to investing by tracking a market index rather than using professional portfolio management, they tend to carry lower expense ratios — a fee charged based on the amount you have invested — than mutual funds. But like mutual funds, investors in index funds are buying a chunk of the market in one transaction.
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