Buying at the best time. Once you know what to buy, don't run out and make a purchase immediately. "There's a reason Wall Street makes money consistently and the average investor doesn't," Seiden says. According to him, that's because Wall Street investors wait until the share price drops before making a purchase, while many new investors buy when prices are highest. The World's Worst Stock Investment Advice
While beginners may prefer the in-depth guidance of other platforms, Barron’s named OptionsHouse “Best for Options Traders” and gave it a 4.5 out of 5 stars overall, and a perfect 5 for its mobile performance. Whether you prefer to trade via desktop, tablet, or mobile, its customizable interface seamlessly transitions between all three — though, admittedly, customers seem to either love or hate the app.

We tapped into the expertise of a former day trader and a financial commentator (with 20 years of trading experience) to grade 13 of the best online stock trading sites. To find our top picks, we analyzed pricing structures, dug into research and tools, and took every platform for a spin. Upfront: There is no one best online stock broker. Each has its own strengths and suits different types of investors and different investment strategies. We’ll help you find the best for your style and experience.


Caution: Some brokerages will require a minimum initial deposit. Schwab, for example, requires $1,000 to start with. Others, such as Ameritrade, have no minimum at all. If you have only a little money to start out with, you will want to check on this requirement before going through all the virtual paperwork of setting up an account. But once you've met the minimum for your particular broker, you're ready to start trading.

For instance, if you purchased an S&P 500 ETF, you are only buying one “thing”. However, that ETF owns stock of all 500 companies in the S&P, meaning you effectively own small pieces of all 500 companies. Your investment would grow, or decline, with the S&P, and you would earn dividends based on your share of the dividend payouts from all 500 companies.
Another key metric to look at is return on equity, which measures a company's ability to turn capital into profits. Return on equity is calculated by taking a year's worth of earnings and dividing that figure by the average shareholder equity for that year. If that number is 15%, for instance, then 15 cents worth of assets are generated for every dollar investors put in. Again, you'll want to compare that number to other companies in the industry to see how it stacks up.

** J.D. Power 2018 Certified Contact Center ProgramSM recognition is based on successful completion of an evaluation and exceeding a customer satisfaction benchmark through a survey of recent servicing interactions. For more information, visit www.jdpower.com/ccc. The ranking or ratings shown here may not be representative of all client experiences because they reflect an average or sampling of the client experiences. These rankings or ratings are not indicative of any future performance or investment outcome.
The capital gains tax rate favors long-term investments. An investor who buys and sells their stocks within a few months will face a higher capital gains tax rate (25 percent) on their profits than an investor who buys and holds their stocks for a full year (15 percent). The larger your investment, the bigger the difference. Granted, there’s a risk to holding an investment for longer, but if you’re close to that one-year cutoff, it might be worth it to sit tight for a few more weeks. INVESTING IN STOCKS FOR BEGINNERS - THE INTELLIGENT INVESTOR BY BENJAMIN GRAHAM ANIMATED BOOK REVIEW
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