And you can find such stocks in lists like the IBD 50, Sector Leaders, IBD Big Cap 20 and IPO Leaders. For example, fast-growing semiconductor designer and artificial intelligence (AI) stock Nvidia was featured on the IBD 50 before it surged 750%. And Apple has been featured on various IBD lists as it has made big moves in recent years. While, of course, not every stock featured on an IBD list will make the type of moves that Nvidia and Apple have made, it does show why it pays to regularly update your list of stocks to watch using these S&P 500-beating screens. (The recent declines in Nvidia, Facebook and Apple also serve as reminders of why the next section — when to sell stocks — is equally critical.)

The good thing about stocks is that they trade on a public exchange, which means it's easy to get up-to-the-minute information on what various companies' shares are selling for. But how do you actually acquire those shares? Well, you need a broker -- either an actual person or an online brokerage firm. These days, many investors opt for the latter, but keep in mind that some accounts have a minimum funding balance you'll need to meet. For example, you might need $1,000 to open an account and start trading.
If mutual funds or bonds are investments you would like to make, it is simpler in terms of minimum deposit amounts. Both of these can be purchased through brokerage firms, where similar deposit rules apply as stocks. Mutual funds also can be purchased through your local bank, often for less than $1,000 when you have an existing relationship with the bank.
Speaking of which, the stock market is well-known for being one of the best places to invest your money. However, many beginners will have absolutely no idea where to start. From the outside, the stock market can seem incredibly scary. Most people only come into contact with it through films or when something bad happens in the news. As a result, you can have a very warped view that the stock market is full of price crashes and billionaires throwing around loads of money.
Based on a unique study of every market cycle since the 1880s, Investor's Business Daily's CAN SLIM Investing System gives you the tools to do just that. It identifies the seven common traits of winning stocks, and provides time-tested rules for how to buy stocks like Nvidia (NVDA), Facebook (FB), Amazon.com (AMZN) or Apple (AAPL) as they begin to climb higher, when to sell to lock in your profits, and how to time the stock market.
Often times, when mentioning dividend stocks, it also includes stocks that pay a non-qualifying dividend such as a distribution. Income trusts, or MLPs, will usually pay non-qualifying dividends in the form of distribution which can also include a return of capital. It’s important to understand the difference between dividends and a distribution as it has tax implication and often time, the stock and dividend growth will differ between the two types of stocks.
If people don’t vote for their politicians and then complain about their governance actions, then maybe they should vote next time. Similarly, if they complain about corporate behavior but don’t vote any of their company shares, and outsource all their ownership to index companies who just abstain on most things, then maybe they should own a stock or two and actually vote. Each individual vote is tiny, but they add up.
Discretionary accounts -- This account allows another person to buy or sell stock on your behalf without telling you. These are commonly used by people who hire a registered investment advisor (RIA) to manage their portfolio for them. Self-directed investors have no need for a discretionary account. It’s only useful if you hire someone else to manage your portfolio for you.
Announcer:                        00:00                     You’re tuned in to the Investing for Beginners podcast. Finally, step by step premium investment guidance for beginners led by Andrew Sather and Dave Ahern to decode industry jargon, silence crippling confusion and help you overcome emotions by looking at the numbers, your path to financial freedom starts now.
Any company you invest in needs to have a moat. That is, they need to have something that prevents their competition from coming in and stealing away the control they have over their market. For example, Coca-Cola is a company with a great moat. Anyone can make soft drinks, but Coca-Cola has entrenched itself in the market. No new soft drink company is going to be stealing away their customers anytime soon.
TD Ameritrade offers two best-in-class platforms, designed for two different types of investors. Both platforms are free to use for any investor with a TD Ameritrade account. The web-based Trade Architect, though often in the shadow of thinkorswim, is streamlined and easy to use. It will appeal to beginning investors, or anyone who prefers a simplified, educational interface. Its tab-based navigation lets users flip between trading tools and account overview, plus charts, stock screeners, heat maps, and more. Since the company acquired Scottrade, our favorite platform for beginners, in 2016, we predict it will continue getting better at serving junior traders.
Limit order -- A limit order differs from a market order in that the trade is only completed at a certain price. For example, if you enter an order to buy 10 shares of Nike at $70 each, the order will only go through if the broker can fill at it at a price of $70 per share. Limit orders are a good way to buy and sell stocks that trade less frequently, since there may not be enough willing sellers to fill a market order at a reasonable price. These orders are a good for “set and forget” investing, since you can place a limit order that will remain in effect until a stock reaches the price at which you’d like to buy.

There are additional conditions you can place on a limit order to control how long the order will remain open. An “all or none” (AON) order will be executed only when all the shares you wish to trade are available at your price limit. A “good for day” (GFD) order will expire at the end of the trading day, even if the order has not been fully filled. A “good till canceled” (GTC) order remains in play until the customer pulls the plug or the order expires; that’s anywhere from 60 to 120 days or more.

E*TRADE does require an investment minimum for new brokerage accounts ($500), which may seem like more than a novice would like to throw in. But you’ll need at least that much to see real growth. And compared to the minimums of traditional brokerages, $500 is an incredibly welcoming threshold. And if you can commit to a $10,000 deposit, you can get 60 days of commission-free trades.
To invest in stocks, think of them as you might your privately held businesses, and remember there are three ways you can make money investing in a stock. Plainly, this means focusing on the price you are paying relative to the risk-adjusted cash flows the asset is generating. Discover how to calculate enterprise value, calculate the gross profit margin and operating profit margin, and compare them to other business in the same sector or industry. Read the income statement and balance sheet. Look at the asset management companies, which hold large stakes, to figure out the types of co-owners with which you are dealing.
It’s a tumultuous time for online stock brokers. The players have largely remained the same, but between significant cuts in commissions and a few major acquisitions (E*TRADE acquired OptionsHouse; TD Ameritrade and Scottrade merged; Ally Invest now lives under Ally Bank), the competition is on its toes. We leveraged seasoned expertise to dig into 13 of the most popular online stock trading sites; here's what we found important.

Most of us don’t have the time to research dozens of individual securities. There are a number of different routes you can take for access and help with investing. The premier choice is typically brokerage firms. These services come with fees, which you should research to find the lowest. There are plenty of brokerages you can join forces with including:
Typically, you put “pre-tax” money into these accounts, which means you don’t pay income tax on those dollars. Any money invested grows without tax until you ultimately withdraw it for living expenses in retirement. As you withdraw funds, you will pay income tax on the withdrawals. However, most people are in a lower tax bracket in retirement so pay lower rates.
After you've decided the way you want to acquire your investment assets, your next decision regards where those investments will be held. This decision can have a major impact on how your investments are taxed, so it's not a decision to be made lightly. Your choices include taxable brokerage accounts, Traditional IRAs, Roth IRAs, Simple IRAs, SEP-IRA, and maybe even family limited partnerships (which can have some estate tax and gift tax planning benefits if implemented correctly).
If you still have high-interest debt, such as credit cards or personal loans, you should hold off on investing. Your money works harder for you by eliminating that pesky interest expense than it does in the market. This is because paying off $1 of debt balance saves you 12%, 14%, or more in future interest expense. More than traditional investments can be expected to return.
Phil Town is an investment advisor, hedge fund manager, 3x NY Times best-selling author, ex-Grand Canyon river guide and a former Lieutenant in the US Army Special Forces. He and his wife, Melissa, share a passion for horses, polo, and eventing. Phil’s goal is to help you learn how to invest and achieve financial independence. You can follow him on google+, facebook, and twitter.

When it comes to research, Fidelity is in a league of its own. The intellectually curious can dive into research from more than 20 providers, including Recognia, Ned Davis, and McLean Capital Management. Fidelity’s Learning Center featured videos are organized by topic, but don’t stop after explaining the concept. They cover how to apply principles to your own Fidelity investments.


Tip: Have $500 or more to invest with a knowledge of how to invest? Consider Wealthfront. They are another robo-advisor that offers low trading fees. With Wealthfront, you can save for retirement, college, or standard investments. They waive the trading fees for the first $10,000 you invest, but do have a $500 minimum balance required. Keep in mind, though Wealthfront only offers digital account management. There are no humans providing advice or answering questions.
Investing in stocks can be very costly if you trade frequently, especially with a small amount of money available to invest. If your broker charges commission fees, every time that you trade stock, either through buying or selling, you will spend extra money. Trading fees range from the low end of $5 per trade but can be as high as $10 for some discount brokers.
To the inexperienced investor, investing may seem simple enough - all you need to do is go to a brokerage firm and open up an account, right? What you may not know, however, is that all financial institutions have minimum deposit requirements. In other words, they won't accept your account application unless you deposit a certain amount of money. With a sum as small as $1,000, some firms won't allow you to open an account.
Leveraging allows you to use borrowed money from banks and brokerage firms to invest in stocks, but you must pay back the amount you borrow with interest. Although leveraging allows you to buy shares that you otherwise might not have access to, if the shares you buy drop in value you’ll be out a lot of money. In general, avoid leveraging because it increases your investment risk.
Understand the commodities market. When you invest in something like a stock or a bond, you invest in the business represented by that security. The piece of paper you get is worthless, but what it promises is valuable. A commodity, on the other hand, is something of inherent value, something capable of satisfying a need or desire. Commodities include pork bellies (bacon), coffee beans, oil, natural gas, and potash, among many other items. The commodity itself is valuable, because people want and use it.
In picking those individual stocks, there are many different yet equally promising strategies you can follow. Some investors concentrate on dividend-paying stocks to provide them with relative safety and security from their stock portfolio, along with regular income that they can use either to cover cash needs or to reinvest into buying additional shares of stock. Value investing involves finding underappreciated stocks whose prices are at a discount to the true intrinsic value of the underlying business, and well-known investors like Warren Buffett have used value-investing tenets to produce strong returns.

Discounted cash flow (DCF) model: the value of a stock is the present value of all its future cash flows. Thus, DCF = CF1/(1+r)^1 + CF2/(1+r)^2 + ... + CFn/(1+r)^n, where CFn = cash flow for a given time period n, r = discount rate. A typical DCF calculation projects a growth rate for annual free cash flow (operating cash flow less capital expenditures) for the next 10 years to calculate a growth value and estimate a terminal growth rate thereafter to calculate a terminal value, then sum up the two to arrive at the DCF value of the stock. For example, if Company A's current FCF is $2/share, estimated FCF growth is 7% for the next 10 years and 4% thereafter, using a discount rate of 12%, the stock has a growth value of $15.69 and a terminal value of $16.46 and is worth $32.15 a share.
In addition to attractive pricing, Ally offers a quality platform that gives you access to the entire universe of stocks and ETFs. Where some discount brokers focus on only one kind of trader (for example, options traders or high-net-worth investors), Ally Invest provides an excellent experience for investors of all kinds. A focus on discounted costs can sometimes be a red flag for quality, but Ally Invest truly delivers with sophisticated calculators, profit-loss estimators, and more. Ally Invest also offers a robust research library that incorporates visual slides and interactive media into its market data.
Growth investors look for companies whose sales and earnings are expected to increase at a faster rate than that of the market average or the average of their peers. The key difference between the growth and value philosophies is that the former places much more emphasis on a company’s revenue, unit sales, and market share, and somewhat less on earnings. Thus, growth investors tend to buy stocks that are already in favor and to pay prices that are relatively high in terms of P/E ratio. In the bull market of the late 1990s, growth investors tended to do very well, and growth returned to favor after the Great Recession.
Favorable conditions within specific sectors of an economy, along with a targeted microeconomic view. [19] Certain industries are usually considered to do well in periods of economic growth, such as automobiles, construction, and airlines. In strong economies, consumers are likely to feel confident about their futures, so they spend more money and make more purchases. These industries and companies are known as “cyclical.” [20] 「Stock Talk 股票英語 Part A」biz全應用速效學習雙週報
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