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In terms of the beginning investor, the mutual fund fees are actually an advantage relative to the commissions on stocks. The reason for this is that the fees are the same regardless of the amount you invest. So, as long as you have the minimum requirement to open an account, you can invest as little as $50 or $100 per month in a mutual fund. The term for this is called dollar cost averaging (DCA), and it can be a great way to start investing.

When you're first starting out, it helps to focus on businesses whose models and products you use or understand. If you're a tech fan, investing in a company that sells gadgets could be a good bet for you. But more than that, you'll want to find companies with a solid competitive advantage. This can come in a number of forms, whether it's an innovative product unlike any other or a fantastically streamlined manufacturing process.
If you’re wondering how to get into the stock market using direct investments, then you have a couple of options. Naturally, you can find a broker, and they will set everything up and help you get started. It makes sense to look around and try to find the best broker for you and your budget. Look at their track record and try to find previous client reviews. If they’re well-known for guiding clients to profitable investments, then they’re well worth your time.
It’s important to consider transaction costs and fees when choosing your investments. Costs and fees can eat into your returns and reduce your gains. It is vital to know what costs you will be liable for when you purchase, hold, or sell stock. Common transaction costs for stocks include commissions, bid-ask spread, slippage, SEC Section 31 fees [31], and capital gains tax. For funds, costs may include management fees, sales loads, redemption fees, exchange fees, account fees, 12b-1 fees, and operating expenses. [32]
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